"REM-UMC 35 REM" dummy

Is this a salesman’s dummy? The projectile is not soft nose, as most sporting/hunting ammo is. Not magnetic at all.
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I would think this is a functional dummy round, which, of course, could also be used in Salesmen’s kits, although they are often left in unplated brass cases with other means of showing they are inert.

As to the FMJ bullet, I don’t know if Remington considered it had a sporting use, but the Remington Models 8 and 81 were popular with Law Enforcement Agencies, including some prison systems, often converted to a high-capacity, detachable-box magazine by the Peace Officer Equipment Corp., usually for Remington and then sold as such by Remington, prominently marked “Police Gun” followed by the name of the purchasing Agency, and located along the upper left side of the receiver.

At the gun shop I worked at in San Francisco, we had two such guns, acquired along with Winchester 94 carbines in .25-35 caliber. They were traded in on .30-30 Winchesters because no one was making FMJ ammunition in either .35 Remington or .25-35 WCF, which was required under Federal law for prison use. I don’t know if that law is still in force or not, having been retired and away from such subjects for 20 years now.

John Moss

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Vladimir+ John Moss
I could be putting my foot into this one but I think this is part of a series of dummies made by Rem-Umc
I have 2 more like that in 32cal and 25cal I once saw please do not ask me where anymore a picture
of these rounds all together there must have been at least 30 of them including pistol rounds they were all
tinn coated and dummys it was an impressive pile I think they must have been made in the 1930.I am
a bit astounded that no one else took note of this round
Sherryl

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Sherryl - The picture identifies this as a REM-UMC dummy round. Remington and Winchester both, at the time these were made, offered dummy rounds in just about all the calibers made. There is nothing particularly special about it except for the FMJ bullet, which I explained in my comments. And yes, they made similar dummy rounds in .32 and .35 Remington Auto rifle calibers, along with those for most of the other rifle, pistol and revolver cartridges, and generally different ones even for shotgun cartridges.

I wouldn’t be particularly astounded that "no one else too note of this round. The question asked was answered, and with rounds as common as Remington dummies, there isn’t much need for speculation or multiple answers.

There are so many little companies (and some big ones) that offer dummy rounds today, but don’t make live ammunition, that the bigger companies no longer offer many of them, except, I assume, on special contracts, as a regular item. There is simply little need for them to do so.

John Moss

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Since the Model 8 was introduced in four calibers (25, 30, 32, and 35), each available in soft nosed and full jacketed versions, I think the FMJ was used for the dummies for the reason the full jacket would resist deformation much better than the soft nose. I have a 32 Remington by UMC, hence early, that has a blackened cupronickel jacketed full patch bullet. Case is tinned and has four holes.

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Jack - that was likely the case. I was focused in on the reason why they made the FMJ bullet loads at all. It makes sense they would use it for functional dummies. I, sometimes, am a “non-functional dummy!” Thanks for refining the probabilities of why they used the FMJ bullet on these.

John

John: They made FMJ bullets for the reason that at that time solids were still regarded as suitable for general hunting, as least in some quarters. When Stewart Edward White took his Wundhammer Springfield to Africa somewhere along about 1908 much of his .30-06 ammunition was the commercial version of the M1906 150 gr. ball service cartridge. Jack

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Thanks Jack. That makes sense too.

John

two on the right are FMJ w/4 case-holes by UMC & the far right has a blackened bullet
The only REM-UMC with a FMJ here is the left example & other than the CORE-LOK (4th from left) he others are hollow point.

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