Remington 310 skeet loads


#1

i am trying to find info and value for remington 310 rimfire skeet ammo ,any help appriciated


#2

Rusty - I hope someone can give you a better answer than I. It is out of my field, and I find very little on this gun and ammo. I have no Remington factory literature that includes it.

The guns and ammunition were made in a quantity of several thousand (highest serial number I have seen recorded was CO2024, but that was simply on a specimen gun and not necessarily the highest number by any means) by Companhia Brasileira de Cartuchos (CBC) for Remington, evidently in the 1960s. Commercial sales were very poor and most of the guns seem to have been sold at a cheap price to Remington employees to get rid of them. They were a single shot gun in the normal form of a single-shot shotgun, for caliber .310 Shot Cartridge (8mm Shot Cartridge). Initial ammunition reportedly was from Brazil, where the gun was also catalogued but named the “Conjunto Mini-Skeet” (Mini Skeet Set). Ammnition sold there was loaded with Number 11 shot, had a rosebud-type crimp, and was boxed in 100 round boxes, bearing the “Expresso” brand. Headstamp of a specimen encountered was “CBC” enclosed in an oval. A fairly current CBC catalog show the headstamp simply as “CBC” with no oval surrounding the letters. The Remington ammunition has been reported as having #12 Shot, but I only saw this in a ad for one of the guns, which seem to be quite collectible.

The gun was catalogued in Brazil for a time, but is not in recent catalogs, although in a catalog c.2005, the cartridge is still shown as the 8m/m Expresso, loaded with 5.0g of #11 Shot.

“The Rimfire Cartridge in the United States & Canada, 1857 to 1984,” by John L. Barber, page 114, shows 7 variations of the .310 Skeet load, all but two with rose-bud crimp and the other two with a heavy rolled mouth crimp. All seem to have the “U” headstamp, with and without a dot in the center of the “U”, although it is hard to tell which has which in the picture caption. I can find nothing in the text about these cartridges, some of which he shows as experimentals. I don’t really know if, when or for how long Remington marketed ammunition in this caliber, of their manufacture. My understanding is that the first ammunition offered was of the CBC brand, but I have no way to confirm the validity of that statement.

I hope this is of some help. I wish I knew something about rimfires - they are a fascinating field, but unfortunately, I am woefully ignorant on them.


#3

I found a little more information on this Remington 310 Skeet gun in "Remington, “America’s Oldest Gunmaker” ", by Roy Marcot, Pages 268-269. It is not much, but it confirms that this .310 Shotgun does date from the early 1960s. The shotguns were intended to be used for skeet shooting on small ranges, using small targets. It brings to mind the Winchester “Wingo” (which was equally a commercial failure). They were intended to be offered with the target throwers and targets, but I can’t find any record of those accessories at all. They included, according to Marcot, the gun, targets, ammunition, self-releasing target ejector, and a coin-operated shooting booth. It is clear from that description that they were meant for sales to commercial outlets, rather than just the public at large, again similar to the Winchester “Wingo.” These outfits were test-marketed at golf ranges (yes, it says “golf”), shooting ranges and local carnivals and fairs. They got very mixed reviews in marketing studies, which indicated the system would sell better abroad than in the U.S. It was decided that the guns would not be made in the United States, but only by CBC.

All of this is about the guns, and not the ammo, but reading between the lines, so to speak, I would doubt that the ammunition made at Ilion by Remington was any more than experimental, with little or none (please note I am hedging there - I said “little or none,” not just “none”) of the ammunition sold to the public. Unfortunately, I have a big gap in my Remington catalogs in the 1960s, so cannot confirm whether or not the ammo, or the guns for that matter, were catalogued in the commercial consumer catalogs.


#4

thank you john for the info, i picked up several thousand rounds of this ammo made by remington , i was trying to decide if it was worth keeping or should i find something to shoot it in


#5

Rusty - I can’t advise you on that. I suspect that you would be hard-pressed to find something to shoot it in. I simply don’t know how rare they are, especially in the Remington configuration and brand. I would have thought, as someone on the outside looking in, that they would be fairly scarce, and if in the original boxes, not hard to dispose of to collectors even in that quantity. If packed 50 to a box, that is only twenty collectors. If loose, than you have just totally deflated whatever collector market there was, since 1,000 rounds would make available a round to most of the rimfire cartridge collectors on the face of the earth.

To make this thread more interesting, could you post a picture of one of the cartridges and the headstamp, and the box if you have it?

If you can’t do that, could you send me either electronically, if you have a flate-plate scanner, or by mail if you can make a photocopy, a picture of the box label if you have it, so I can flesh out my files. I can PM you my mailing address. If you don’t have the boxes, which would be a shame, then I won’t need any picture of the cartridge, since I have Brazilian pictures and the picture in the book I referenced.

If you can’t do any pictures on the Forum and you have the box, you might at least describe it as to style and content (50 rounds, 100 rounds?) in text on this thread. We all want to learn as much as we can, especially those of us not knowledgeable on rimfires. Thanks.

John Moss


#6

john , i recieved the ammo in a five gallon bucket, no boxes included


#7

That sounds like someone cleaned out a corner in a Remington warehouse.
Too bad. It would have been nice to see if Remington ever even got around to a box for these. We don’t seem to have any real rimfire specialists on the forum. I have no idea if this stuff is common or rare, and whether or not Remington boxes are known or not. Maybe every rimfire collector in the world has a box in his collection. Maybe no one has.


#8

If price is an indication of rarity, At most sale sites you can buy a 310 skeet shell for $2-3.


#9

The typical 310 Skeet will sell for a buck or two. Dummies, proofs and copper case rounds sell for more. There are variations in crimps, headstamps and shot size but only we die hard rimfire collecters seem to care about these.

Paul


#10

Here are pictures of all the boxes up to the 1980’s. The box marked “.32 RF SHOT” was the first production run by Remington. As soon as I can get them scanned I will post the original Remington Franchise brochure.



#11

Here are the original pages from the Remington ad for .310 Skeet. I will check tomorrow, but I do not think the .310 Skeet Ammunition was ever listed in any Remington catalog.


#12

Thanks for the latest postings, guys. That’s the kind of stuff that makes one of these forum Threads a real adequate file in its on right.

John Moss