Remington projectile that “hits like a brick”


#1

Of baked red clay with a raised headstamp, (front-stamp) this primitive projectile weighs almost 4 pounds and is 7.5” x 3” x 2.25”. Velocity when fired (pun intended), or a maximum range has yet been discovered / determined, but it has been said it should have the glide path (an aeronautical term) of a rock, but hit like a brick.

Perhaps once fired, or once dropped (hopefully not on a toe) it has a large chip on the lower right front corner, and some AZ dust. Manufactured at an unknown to us time, it is quite rare as we are aware of only one other, which is perhaps still in a Connecticut collection.

The accuracy must not have been very satisfactory otherwise we think more of these would be found, due to increased production other than for the unknown and undetermined by us experimental trial(s?). Or perhaps the accuracy was not so bad and when they were all fired (yep, again) they were either then rendered unusable, or perhaps not recovered, and some now still lay undisturbed and whole at an unknown Bridgeport, Conn. location.

So we inquire, does anyone have, or know of a more aerodynamic example of this primitive and rare Remington projectile, perhaps one with rounded corners?

The provenance of this, to us, was via Steve Fuller from the John H. Hintlian collection.


front

back


#2

I think the brick was used in combat by our early ancestors just like this other bone type.


#3

My guess is that the brick may have been made up for some building project at a Remington facility, or maybe as a paver (but I doubt that,as pavers are usually smooth, and any words would not have been in bas-relief). It would not have difficult for any brickmaker to fabricate brick molds with the Remington logo at a modest extra cost.

Perhaps someone at the Remington collectors site would know more, as there are so many non-gun Remington items around.


#4

fredericremington.org/centennia … php?cID=75

Maybe it is one of these bricks being sold by the Frederic Remington the illustrators Art Museum? Then again the Remington Arms factory in Ilion, NY is mostly of brick construction.


#5

This was over 30 years ago when I lived in Ft. Worth. At the time (late 1970s), the mammoth Swift and Armour packing houses in the Ft. Worth stockyards north of downtown were being demolished, and I’d estimate millions of bricks had been used to build them - literally mountains of bricks were piled on site. And some contractor was salvaging them for resale. I remember seeing some bricks that had either Swift or Armour markings on them - I don’t remember which. So maybe marked bricks are not that uncommon.

Lots and lots of bricks are pictured here ibcabrick.com/brick_map.htm but I did not look to see if there were any Remingtons. And some people think cartridge collectors are crazy. Brick collectors must be crazier. At least cartridges don’t weigh as much as bricks.

Lo and Behold! - there is a Remington brick here: ibcabrick.com/images/bricks/ … tonKen.jpg


#6

Pete, is there any remnants of mortar on the brick?

Joe


#7

other than the chip, & AZ dust, as new Joe


#8

Very interesting. Pete, personally I would try to get in contact with THE INTERNATIONAL BRICK COLLECTORS ASSOCIATION via the link Dennis provided. Especially the person by the name of Ken D. Jones that obviously has one in his collection. It says to contact Jim Graves at brickcollector@gmail.com if you have questions.

Joe


#9

Joe, the photo says “want one for our collection”.

Actually this was all done as a tongue in cheek post, hopefully to add a little giggle to everyone’s day, still, thanks to everyone for all the information!


#10

OK, the picture also says “KEN’S COLLECTION” so I figured it must be one of the founders. Anyways just figured you might be looking for an estimated value as you are always buying and selling.


#11

I am sure there is a backstory about the brick many of us would like to learn. Bricks are ammunition too.


#12

Believe it or don’t, in another life my wife and I collected bricks with different “headstamps”. Where we lived in Alaska was an old gold-mining town and the foundaries and smelting kilns used bricks manufactured by many different makers. We had a fireplace hearth made entirely of headstamped bricks - no two alike.

Ray


#13

[quote=“RayMeketa”]Believe it or don’t, in another life my wife and I collected bricks with different “headstamps”. Where we lived in Alaska was an old gold-mining town and the foundaries and smelting kilns used bricks manufactured by many different makers. We had a fireplace hearth made entirely of headstamped bricks - no two alike.

Ray[/quote]

That would truly be a neat fireplace to see!


#14

I hadn’t thought about the similarities between brick markings and headstamps. Except bricks are usually undated.