Rimfire safety


#1

Hello Forumites!!

Since using an inertia puller isn’t recommended for removing the bullet on rimfires, what method is recommended for removing the bullets on [.44] rimfires??
When empty, I assume 24 hours in a good penetrating oil will kill the priming powder. Or is it safest to just fire the primer powder in the pistol??

Hope to hear from one of you “experts” soon.
George


#2

George,
I hope I’m not being to nosy when I ask why you’re removing those bullets and what .44 rim fire cartridge (short, long, Henry?) it is that you are pulling them from?


#3

Hello Guy,
I want to “dummy” two .44 short cartridges [for a British Bulldog pistol] so I can safely display them with the pistol.
George


#4

Are you sure they are rimfires and not inside primed cartridges?


#5

The .44 British Bulldog was a centrefire round. Its easy to check on your revolver if its RF or not.

However the name bulldog became generic for pistols of that type and there were .44RF “Bulldogs” made. The most common (in the US) being Hammond. Almost certainly a few Belgian made copies too under various names.(or no name)

If its a Hammond its probably more valuable than the British varients, and older. Depending on condition of course. Look in the barrel and chambers, any sign of pitting? many of these pistols have never been fired because they were pocket pistols carried daily but not fired. Trouble is if they were fired they were usually never cleaned properly because the sort of people who bought them didn’t know how. If there is a ring of pitting in each of the chambers in a circle where the bullet goes thats not from firing. Its where the tallow on the OL bullets has attacked the steel.

The round is so feeble it wont open a can of beans. If it is a RF don’t fire the primers off in the pistol because they are corrosive, and your pistol will require a full clean, thats if they go off at all.


#6

George

There’s a 95% chance that those old cartridges will not fire anyway, so you’re probably safe in leaving them as is. If you do not feel good about doing that, it may be better in the long run to disable your revolver by filing down the firing pin so it will not fire at all. A very simple operation that won’t change the appearance of the revolver at all.

There are a lot of different “Bulldog” revolvers, both CF and RF, in a variety of calibers. I have one that’s a CF 38 caliber. Found it while metal detecting in Canada many years ago. It’s still loaded.

You Brits should be familiar with Captain Bulldog Drummond a pre-WWII James Bond. His character was introduced to American radio audiences during WWII and I used to listen regularly. I don’t know if there was any connection between him and the Bulldog revolvers.

Ray


#7

Hello “oldguy”

I’ve never tried to inert a rimfire so I can’t help you out there. You might be able to find a couple of 44 RF board dummies. Sometimes they are reasonably priced most of the times not! Or you might be able to unload and inert a 44 RF blank then place an appropriate bullet back in it.

Good luck

Paul


#8

Some people might prefer to drill or file a hole in the side of the case and dump out the powder and inert the primer rather than trying to pull the bullet. How to do that safely is beyond my level of expertise to discuss, and probably beyond the scope of what is allowed on this forum.


#9

Speaking of rimfire safety - one thing you should always avoid is dropping and losing a rimfire cartridge on a carpeted floor. I almost lost one on the floor of my room at the Renaissance hotel at the last SLICS and if I hadn’t found it I can just imagine what might have happened should it have been sucked up into a fast rotating vacuum with metal parts - BANG. Not that it would “shoot” or hurt anyone, but the bang would be scary and it might hurt the vacuum.


#10

Some one dropped a .22 LR cartridge down the hot air furnace cover on the floor when I was young.

My brother was sitting on this hot air vent trying to get warm when that round went off.

The case moved a lot faster than the bullet but the only damage was only to Peter’s nerves. He quickly moved.

Glenn


#11

[quote=“RayMeketa”]George

You Brits should be familiar with Captain Bulldog Drummond a pre-WWII James Bond. His character was introduced to American radio audiences during WWII and I used to listen regularly. I don’t know if there was any connection between him and the Bulldog revolvers.

Ray[/quote]

The bulldog is in a sense the “British” animal in perhap the same way as the American Eagle is used in the US. It occours in many places as the symbol of Britishness. Our equivilent of the pictorially represented figure of Uncle Sam is John Bull who is usually pictured with a bulldog at his side. The bulldog in question bearing a strong resemblance to Spike in the Tom and Jerry cartoons.

With regard to the revolvers the name was a trademark and so should be attributed only to those correctly bearing the name but like most things in those days it seems to have been a bit of a free for all.


#12

Common practice and I have seen it done with pinfire cartridges but I would feel uneasy about drilling into black powder…


#13

The Hammond Bulldog was a single-shot pistol, not a revolver, as I recall. Correct me if I am wrong.

John Moss


#14

John, you are correct, you usually are, I don’t have a picture, just took it from a bulldog reference in an antique pistols price guide and put 2+2 togeather.

Since then I googled it up and found a picture of one on offer for $650 which seems like a lot.