Rimmed 30-06?


#1

I seem to be having good luck finding strange things these days. Please see the photo of what looks like a 30-06 with a rim. The photo below has it compared to a .30 cal ball round.

The measurements of this cartridge are:
case length: 63.09 mm
bullet dia: 7.74mm
Rim Dia 13.81 mm

Bullet is magnetic, brass primer, HS is WRA 54

Next photo shows comparison of case heads.

Close up of HS

Anyone know what this is?

Thanks


#2

7.7 x 63R mm ?


#3

All I can think is .30-06 that somehow escaped final rim turning?


#4

The .30 Flanged Nitro (Purdey) is about the only commercial round I can find that is even close dimensionally, but both its case length and base diameter are slightly less than the .30-'06, and it more closely resembles the .30-40 Krag. Also the military-style WRA 54 headstamp makes no sense for the .30 Flanged. Maybe an experimental round? QC would necessarily be very far out of kilter for it to have been a manufacturing error. About the only reason for such a round would be for use in a double rifle or combination gun. I wouldn’t rule out a custom case for someone who wanted a custom double rifle in .30-'06R, but the headstamp makes that unlikely, as someone with enough money to finance such a project would likely also want a special HS.


#5

I think it’s a send-up but haven’t a clue how it was fabricated. Jack


#6

Here is an interesting article on how such a rimmed creation can be manufactured:

dave-cushman.net/shot/44-06_ … uglas.html

Dave


#7

The .30 Purdey does not only “resemble” the .30-40 Krag…it IS a British version of the .30-40 Krag. The .30-40 Krag in the United Kingdom is known as the .30 U.S.A. Model or .30-220. The .30 Purdey cartridges were headstamped KYNOCH .30-220 or KYNOCH 30 P.

Randy


#8

All,

Thank for the ideas. But this looks like a factory round to me. The headstamping does look a bit larger than on regular military 30 cal. Any Winchester collectors out there can weigh in.


#9

No question that a rim could be swaged onto a rimless case, and that there are other ways to graft a rimmed case base onto a rimless body, and in fact I have even done that. However, the photos give no indication of such a marriage being performed. Then there’s the headstamp. I agree the rimmed case was likely originally manufactured that way, but why, how, or by whom will probably remain a mystery.

By the way, I have a strange fired .30-'06 case which appears (by magnet attraction) to have a lacquered steel body with a separate steel rimless base somehow attached to it. HS is 30-06 SPRG plus an unclear small character which could be a B, a 6, or a 9. Probably not too odd, as I found a number of these at a range several years ago and just picked up one out of curiosity. Anyone know about this and why the 2-piece construction?


#10

A so-called “.30-06 Ballistic Test” actually exist with a rimmed case but it has no groove, it is loaded with a Silvertip bullet and the headstamp is Winchester commercial.


#11

[quote=“Flectarn”]All,

Thank for the ideas. But this looks like a factory round to me. The headstamping does look a bit larger than on regular military 30 cal. Any Winchester collectors out there can weigh in.[/quote]

Please post a close up photo of the neck crimp.


#12

I believe that style headstamp was used by WRA on some contract ammunition made after WWII. Whether or not the cartridge is a contract item I have no way of knowing. My 7.7x63Rmm SWAG was simply to get things rolling because no one was responding.

Ray


#13

Dr Schmitt,

Close ups of Neck and crimp and the rim.


#14

[quote=“DennisK”]
By the way, I have a strange fired .30-'06 case which appears (by magnet attraction) to have a lacquered steel body with a separate steel rimless base somehow attached to it. HS is 30-06 SPRG plus an unclear small character which could be a B, a 6, or a 9. Probably not too odd, as I found a number of these at a range several years ago and just picked up one out of curiosity. Anyone know about this and why the 2-piece construction?[/quote]

can you please post a detailed picture of the headstamp and lower part of the case

thx
Rene


#15

The one I have has a headstamp of WRA 42. I have it listed as an unfinished case. Bill


#16

I had one of these in the past but don’t recall how it was IDed. I will look into it further.


#17

Received the following from the Woodin Lab after sending Bill the photos.

[quote]This is usually an unfinished case which has gone through the loading process, either accidentally or deliberately as a joke. The ones I’ve seen are Winchester, whose manufacturing process includes a stage in which the case has a rim. For example, we have WRA 42, WRA 54, WRA 30-06, SUPERSPEED 30G.1906.

I am sending a copy of this to Frank, as he has a better knowledge of the manufacturing process, and is really the one to answer this.
Bill

[/quote]

Falcon suggested this in his early posting on this thread.

I have seen a number of cartridges where an unfinished case continued through the loading process. The round in this thread is interesting because the “rim” appeared to have been trimmed square, and not rounded as would be expected from the heading process. Perhaps Winchester was using some sort of two stage trimming process.

Cheers,
Lew


#18

[quote]can you please post a detailed picture of the headstamp and lower part of the case

thx
Rene[/quote]
From Rene’s earlier question about my odd .30-'06 2-piece (seemingly) steel case. As I earlier said, I found a couple of dozen of these empties at a range a few years ago and just picked up one out of curiosity as I had not seen a case like this before. It appears the body of the case has been necked down to fit into the base, and that’s also how it looks through a 10X magnifier. The single symbol at the top of the HS looks like a B but it could be something else, maybe a 6, 9, or 8. I know absolutely nothing else. Maybe Russian or Chinese?


#19

I have seen those cases somewhere on the internet before. I believe they are made by the Russian company Barnaul Ammunition.


#20

Flectarn, your cartridge have what it looks exactly like a Winchester case before head turning:

These are 7.62 x 51 mm NATO draw steps from Frost’s “Ammunition Making”: