Russian 9x53R box


#1

Here’s a box of 9x53R cartridges I received from a Russian collector; I was not even aware of this cartridge until a couple of years ago, perhaps due to the lack of interest in the US for walrus hunting, for which it appears the cartridge is intended. These apparently are a wildcat based on the 7.62x53R (aka 7.62x54R) case. It being a rimmed cartridge doesn’t help its popularity as a sporting cartridge in this country either, except possibly to someone with a Moisin-Nagant who is considering converting it to a larger caliber.

There is no ‘Made in Russia’ marking on the box, nor is much of the labeling in non-Cyrillic characters, which likely indicates that the ammunition was not intended to be exported.

This box, as well most of the other Russian sporting ammunition boxes I have have a PCT logo (on this box, it is to the lower right of the cartridge illustration; can anyone enlighten me as to what PCT stands for?

The box shows the headstamp as LVE 00 9x53R, but the cartridges are headstamped 188 92. LVE represents the Novosibirsk Low -Voltage Equipment Plant in Novosikirsk, Russia.


#2

Guy,

Very cool box! That must be the first “walrus load” I’ve seen. If I figure right, that’s a 231 gr. bullet at 2149 fps (for 2366 fp). I’m curious what the text in the upper left in the view with the cartridge says. Is that suggesting these are for 150-400 kg (330-880 lb.) critters? That would be a smaller walrus, no? Perhaps Vlad (or our other Forum members familiar with Russian) could help out here?

Dave


#3

I knew the cartridge but had never seen a box.


#4

Factory 188 is LVE.


#5

Guy, the RST and GIS are signs of “Russian standardization” and “passed standardization”.

These cartridges also do exist with brass cases.


#6

[quote=“DaveE”]Guy,

If I figure right, that’s a 231 gr. bullet at 2149 fps (for 2366 fp). I’m curious what the text in the upper left in the view with the cartridge says. Is that suggesting these are for 150-400 kg (330-880 lb.) critters? That would be a smaller walrus, no? Perhaps Vlad (or our other Forum members familiar with Russian) could help out here?

Dave[/quote]

Correct, a 15 gram projectile at 655 m/s for critters of 150-400 kg.


#7

Some thirty (30) years ago, the Baikal Importers in Australia had this ammo and the 9x53R “Medved” (Bear) semi-Auto Hunting rifle in this calibre.

I have only seen the rifle in Photos, but it looks like a “upsized” SKS type action with a 5 round fixed box magazine, with sporting type woodwork.

I don’t know how the ammo was boxed, but given that the .22R and 5,6x39 Deer Cartridges were in Cyrillic Boxes, I would assume the 9x53R was similar.
( the forenamed cartridges were all Tula, probably the 9x53R was also???( “T” H/s)

Regards,
DocAV
AV Ballistics
Brisbane Australia


#8

Guy,
You say that rimmed cartridges are not popular here in the hunting circles. Why? I don’t hunt but shoot 7.62x54R and don’t know any reason for not using it against animals. What makes hunters prefer rimmless over rimmed?


#9

sks,
Hunters in the US tend to use rimless center fire cartridges in box magazine fed guns. The center fire rimmed hunting cartridges that are being used here for the most part are those that were developed for use in the tube fed Winchesters. Not much in rimmed cartridges has been developed in recent years that has caught on. Sure you can use the 7.62 x 54R for hunting, but how many serious hunters do?


#10

Speaking from experience when the 225 Win first came out, the one I had would have a momentary catch when you chambered a new round, if you did not pay attention to how you loaded the clip, never really bad but still present.


#11

I had a Lapua 9x53R in my collection. I also thought that it was for converted Mosin-Nagant rifles. Is it a Finnish design? I thought that the official designation for the parent cartridge was 7.62x53R in Finland.


#12

The Finnish cartridge is actually called 9.3x53R. The earliest of these are known with early “VPT” hs used prior to the c1947-1949 ‘VMT’ hs. It is believed to have been commercially introduced c1946 along with the three other Finnish sporting cartridges produced from the 7.62x53R case (as it is known in Finland): 6.3x53R, 7x53R and 8.3x53R.

The 9x53R Russian hunting cartridge shows slight shoulder differences with the Finnish and it is debateable whether they are interchangeable. Although often listed as 9mm, the actual bullet diameter appears to be c9.25mm which is close to the Finnish equivalent. This may well be interchangeable with the 9.3x53R Finnish.

The Russian version was evidently designed by N.M.Bljumn and introduced in 1962. All hs encountered with this case use the ‘188’ factory code of LVE (Novosibirsk) with dates from 1959-2000+ (early years are likely to have used reworked cases ?).


#13

Well, I don’t know, but the .30-30 Winchester and .22 Long Rifle are arguably among the most widely used and popular hunting cartridges in the US and they are both rimmed… as are all the shotgun shells in use… .30-40 Krag was also very popular for hunting for many years as well and the .45-70 is gaining popularity again…

AKMS


#14

[quote]Well, I don’t know, but the .30-30 Winchester and .22 Long Rifle are arguably among the most widely used and popular hunting cartridges in the US and they are both rimmed… as are all the shotgun shells in use… .30-40 Krag was also very popular for hunting for many years as well and the .45-70 is gaining popularity again…

AKMS
[/quote]

The point I was making was that there hasn’t been a new rimmed centerfire cartridge that has come along in recent years that has been accepted well in this country.

The .30-30 is one of those Winchester cartridges that continues to hang on 100 plus years after its introduction. The resurgence of the .45-70 I believe is a due in part to the cowboy shooting craze and the fascination with the old West. The rimfires can’t really be included in the discussion, because they require a rim for their ignition.


#15

True that not many new rimmed cartridges have come about, but the .444 Marlin and .375 Winchester seem to be popular still. The introduction of the “Lever-Revolution” line of improved ammunition peaks to the continued popularity of the .30-30 Win, etc. There is a following for these and the .45-70 in the lever actions as hard-hitting brush guns. Maybe around here my perspective is skewed because much of the hunting is in thick brush and swamps. The lever actions are still very popular here. At least half of the rifles in any gun shop rack around here are levers…

Granted that the rimless cartridge is king, but the rimmed variety is not dead yet!

I’d hunt with my Mosin-Nagant M-91/30 if it wasn’t 9 feet long…

AKMS