Russian big bore reference


#1

aa


#2

Hello,

I am very interested in this topic, as I am writing on a comprehensive book on Soviet ammunition myself.

However, it is impossible to make a reasonable price for a book with small print run. For ammunition related books, which are only interesting for a small number of people worldwide, the maximum print run is limited to 1000 pieces. Nobody would be able to sell more I guess …
However, this also resulst in a high price per copy.

From the experiences of Josef Motz


#3

Hi, Chris!
Price to my point of view price is high but for example I’m ready to pay for GOOD book. For example SPIW book costs with delivery to Russia 170$. The problem is how to know what is quality of book (I believe you and many other people who are know you but selling mean potentially more than 10, 100 or 200 copies). If it will be selling in Amazon readers will have ability read some pages before buy it. But Amazon’s DHL delivery is not cheap also… Fast but not cheap (so for example to delivery to Russia total price will costs 200$). To may point of view making open free samples which could help find out what is inside will help many people to make decision to buy book.
And good alternative is making it available as e-book. But be ready to protect it.


#4

Uh, I see nothing on the German ECRA site about buying these books, although I can find them with their published prices and the (OUCH !!) shipping costs. Of course, my command of German is only slightly greater than my knowledge of Martian, so I could well be missing something.

Any German-speaking ECRA members want to throw me a life line here?

A bulk shipment for a group by surface mail might make things more palatable. I don’t know the German postal rates / regulations, but there is a special class for domestic media mail under the US system and while it is not publicized, there is comparable classification for international shipment. Not fast, but substantially less expensive (roughly 50%) than even regular surface rates.

Any thoughts, folks?

.


#5

I bought my copies from Motz being refered through the European site through the link on the IAA page. That was last year and I have not checked it since. The European’s club does not offer wholesale to US dealers to promote their sales. I gave up because the price in the US for most of their books bought at retail and with shipping added is too high BEFORE adding on any profit. I have done plenty of public service for the collecting community(like many of you) but draw the line at stocking and handeling publications for publishers who will not offer wholesale terms.


#6

[quote=“russianammo”]Hello,

I am very interested in this topic, as I am writing on a comprehensive book on Soviet ammunition myself.

However, it is impossible to make a reasonable price for a book with small print run. For ammunition related books, which are only interesting for a small number of people worldwide, the maximum print run is limited to 1000 pieces. Nobody would be able to sell more I guess …
However, this also resulst in a high price per copy.

From the experiences of Josef Motz


#7

My future book is not just about ammunition, but also about the guns that fire them. As far as I know nobody has yet published any book on Soviet/Russian guns caliber 12.7mm - 57mm (including both calibers). This includes mainly aircraft guns and automatic cannons.
I will not only describe the ammunition, but also the developmental history and technical caracteristiscs (operation mechanism with cutaway drawing) of the guns.
I intentionally do this to widen the range of people possibly interested in such information.

Yes, and of course I would provide sample pages (and later: updates and corrections) on my webpage.

Any thoughts about that?
Chris


#8

Chris and Yuri -

You might wish to check with Lew Curtis. He does the publishing on demand bit and the result is a credit to any reference library.

And if the results should be по-русский, at least I have a fighting chance of reading them and would almost certainly be one of the “small market” who would line up to buy a copy. Perhaps more than one, depending on the discounts! ;-)

.


#9

[quote=“russianammo”]My future book is not just about ammunition, but also about the guns that fire them. As far as I know nobody has yet published any book on Soviet/Russian guns caliber 12.7mm - 57mm (including both calibers). This includes mainly aircraft guns and automatic cannons.
I will not only describe the ammunition, but also the developmental history and technical caracteristiscs (operation mechanism with cutaway drawing) of the guns.
I intentionally do this to widen the range of people possibly interested in such information.

Yes, and of course I would provide sample pages (and later: updates and corrections) on my webpage.

Any thoughts about that?
Chris[/quote]

Col. George Chinn USMC (the late) did a volume on the Soviet MGs in his series. Check it out.


#10

[quote=“Iconoclast”]Chris and Yuri -

You might wish to check with Lew Curtis. He does the publishing on demand bit and the result is a credit to any reference library.

And if the results should be по-русский, at least I have a fighting chance of reading them and would almost certainly be one of the “small market” who would line up to buy a copy. Perhaps more than one, depending on the discounts! ;-)

.[/quote]

Good advice- Lew puts out some good stuff and should know the ropes. Also contact George Hoyem at Armory Pubs. and ask him. He may be ready for another project.


#11

You might want to check with Tony Williams in the UK, who wrote Rapid Fire, an excellent study of heavy machine gun through light artillery type guns, ammo, mounts and fire control systems. Well balanced, well researched, quite readable and excellent historical and technical perspective. He has written several other books on arms and ammo and should have a good feel for the world market for such books.
My gut feeling is that there is a modest market for books on small arms and their ammunition (especially of a type that is available to collectors). There is a much smaller niche market for machine gun type books and their ammo (if different from rifle caliber). Getting into the heavier calibers, I think the market drops to a very small number of serious collectors or scholars.
The cost of printing (on paper), storage, marketing and shipping are likely to drive the price to a self-destruct level, or make the project a failure unless the author is willing to subsidize the work. Making it available in digital format (CD or DVD) allows lavish use of color, easy search by users, and economical duplication on demand, and low cost shipping.
My observations are based on peddling books to collectors, and working with the project to make the IAA Journals available in digital format.


#12

Tony has Jane’s behind him so no problem getting his stuff published.Good stuff-no doubt. A German language heavy book about Russian guns and ammo is again another matter. The German market is smaller than the English market by far and I doubt an English language publisher would take the job. Good luck and don’t give up before asking everybody at least twice.