Russian Grach and PSS Pistols, Silent Mortar


#1

In the latest issue of GunMag I received yesterday, there was a brief article about the Russian Grach (their spelling, rhymes with Glock), that looks like a hammerless CZ-75, and PSS pistols, plus the 9mm 7N21 and 7N31 cartridges, and a picture of the PSS silent round (although little information about it was provided). It also mentioned the 2B25 silent mortar, described as being silent and leaving no smoke of flame signature. I’ve read a little about the the Grach pistol and its AP ammunition, but have never heard of the PSS nor the silent mortar. Anyone know about those? How does one make a mortar with no noise, flame, or smoke unless it is mechanical, like a catapult, or uses compressed gas as a propellant?


#2

Perhaps it uses the same kind of captive piston set-up that other Russian “silent” cartridges use?


#3

Some information I found, probably from Rosoboronexport at SOFEX 2012, Amman, Jordan:

• 82mm 2B25 silent mortar. This is an ideal weapon for special operations units designed for surprise and concealed engagement of enemy manpower at ranges of 100 to 1200 meters. On firing, the bomb tail seals the powder gases, so there is no smoke, nor loud noise, nor flash, nor muzzle blast. The bomb of the 2B25 mortar carries a powerful 1.9 kg warhead containing a lot of preformed fragments. Another important advantage of the mortar is its low weight (a mere 13 kg), which allows units to make long forced marches.

• PSS silent pistol. The PSS pistol fires special 7.62mm SP-4 cartridges with cutoff of the powder gases inside the cartridge case, which helped give up a cumbersome and heavy silencer. Nonetheless, this cartridge retains enough killing power after penetrating a 2mm steel sheet at a range up to 25 m (the maximum firing range is 50 m). The PSS also features compactness, which makes it convenient for concealed carry and, most notably, for quick removal and use.

SOFEX seems like it would an interesting event to attend. Did anyone go this year?


#4

The mortars are self contained spigot types. Basically a reverse captive piston cartridge where the war head is “fixed to the case”. Nothing new at all since the principle was used in WWII already. The Russians had also a 60mm version many years ago but it was experimental only and did not enter service (back then in Soviet times export seemed to be no option). There are several similar systems in the west. The latest I have seen two weeks ago was the “FLY-K” by Rheinmetall.

rheinmetall-defence.com/inde … 289&lang=3


#5

Hello

PYa pistol is not hammerless - its hammer is semi-concealed from the sides by slide extensions, which IMHO is a stupid idea.
details on the pistol can be found here: world.guns.ru/handguns/hg/rus/ya … ach-e.html

PSS pistol: world.guns.ru/handguns/hg/rus/pss-silent-e.html

7,62mm SP-4 silent ammo for PSS: world.guns.ru/ammunition/russian … .html#SP-4


#6

The Chinese also have a 50mm captive piston spigot mortar system.

[quote=“DennisK”]Some information I found, probably from Rosoboronexport at SOFEX 2012, Amman, Jordan:

• 82mm 2B25 silent mortar. This is an ideal weapon for special operations units designed for surprise and concealed engagement of enemy manpower at ranges of 100 to 1200 meters. On firing, the bomb tail seals the powder gases, so there is no smoke, nor loud noise, nor flash, nor muzzle blast. The bomb of the 2B25 mortar carries a powerful 1.9 kg warhead containing a lot of preformed fragments. Another important advantage of the mortar is its low weight (a mere 13 kg), which allows units to make long forced marches.[/quote]

That’s a new one to me. Can anyone add to Dennis’ info?


#7

[quote=“TonyWilliams”]

That’s a new one to me. Can anyone add to Dennis’ info?[/quote]
Tony, reading online Russian sources (like this one) i can confirm that
More info (in Russian) and more photos are available at this link

manufacturer’s website (in English, brief description)

It appears that propelling system of the 3BO35 (3БО35) projectile looks like inverted PZ/PZAm round, with long captive piston hidden inside the tail of the projectile. But again, it could be a spigot type launcher, with short piston. I will try to find more non-classified ;) info, if possible.


#8

Thanks Max!

PS - any idea when this was introduced, and who uses it?


#9

The the lot-# on the depicted rounds says “experimental”. These were just offered on the international market. Judging by the already issued full military designation for the weapon and ammunition it seems to be adopted already or it is in process of being so.

They say it is for anti terrorist ops and for spec ops.

Here a video showing it in operation and a cutaway:

youtube.com/watch?v=U-UstniLzQA