Rydbeck's Rifle


#1

Hello All,
I was looking at the Armémuseum website and have found many early and unusual cartridges.
At https://digitaltmuseum.se/011024405386/patron there is a cartridge labeled as:
" Patron till gevär 1865 Rydbeck, Schweiz"
Here is a copy of the image.

There is also a bullet labeled for the Rydbeck rifle as well at https://digitaltmuseum.se/011024405388/gevarskula.

Can anyone tell me what this cartridge is and what was the firearm it was intended for?
I did a search for Rydbeck and didn’t find anything.

Thanks and happy Labor Day,
Brian


#2

Take a look at this, " Gevär m/1863-65", Rydbeck Mechanism from a Swedish Museum:

Rough translation:
Guns w / 1863-65
Group E II.
Changed from infantry rifle Model/1863 with Rydbeck’s mechanism. The rifle is attached to a label on which it says: “Rear-back project, Switzerland, 1863 rifle gun, changed according to the Swedish Rydbeck system M 65; on the mechanism Rydbeck is in October 1865, on the same page: Chomas på Paris. On the lock is” Erlach & Co in Thun "

I also found a reference to a patent;
Breech-loading fire-arms, Patent # 593, 26th Feb. 1866, Sven Rydbeck.


#3

Thanks BadgerJack,
I didn’t think to search in the same website I found the cartridge.
Senility must be setting in :-)

All the best,
Brian


#4

Found these, but not the drawings:

A.D. 1866, February 26.—N° 593.
RYDBECK, SVEN.— (Provisional protection only).—" Improve-
" ments in breech-loading fire-arms."
The breech is to be closed by a sliding bolt in which a needle
striker is made to work. The bolt is moved by a lever motion,
and is secured in its place by a catch, or by a plug, which is fitted
in " a transverse groove."
[Printed, 4d. No Drawings.]

A.D. 1864, November 8.—N° 2777.
RYDBECK, SVEN.—" Improvements in breech-loading fire-arms
" and cartridges."
The breech is closed by a block hinged at its fore part to the
barrel. The block is released by a lever acting on the top of the
breech, and is then turned back to allow the cartridge to be
inserted in the barrel. The cartridge contains its own ignition.
Behind a charge of loose powder is placed " a disc or stopper of
" gunpowder moulded in a suitable mould ;" in the centre of it is
a recess, in which is placed a percussion cap, and behind which is
a perforated wad of greased felt. The cap is discharged by a
needle working in a slide in the breech block ; it is propelled by a
blow from the hammer which strikes a projecting piece connected
with the needle slide. The slide is drawn back by the action of a
coiled spring. Cartridges may be made without the plug or disc
of compressed or moulded gunpowder, the flange of the percus
sion cap being in that case held between two perforated discs of
leather.
[Printed, 10d. Drawing.]


#5

And one last, (Interesting that I cannot find any patent drawings…), from “MECHANICS MAGAZINE, AND JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING, AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY, MANUFACTURES, AND SHIPBUILDING.,
VOL. XII. (NEW SERIES). JULY TO DECEMBER, 1864.”

2777 S. Rydbeck, Skofile, Sweden. Improvements in breech-loading fire-arms and cartridges. Dated November 9, 1864. *


#6

Sharp cartridge. To the projected rifle of Rydbeck’s construction, Switzerland, 1865.”

I presume this to mean a pointed projectile?

Did you find anything on the cartridge dimensions?


#7

Hello BadgerJack,
Thanks for the additional information.
I can get dimensions from the image since there is a scale present.
They are not exact, but probably close.

inches mm
Rim Diameter: 0.575 14.6
Base Diameter: 0.488 12.4
Shoulder Diameter:
Neck Diameter: 0.480 12.2
Bullet Diameter: 0.437 11.1
Case Length: 1.949 49.5

Al the best,
Brian


#8

I have not found anything on the cartridge- yet- but I still have several old manuals to look through, just not tonight.
Thursday… reading and searching day!


#9

Hi BadgerJack,
I’m in the process of moving and will be for the next two months so all my research material is packed.
Thanks for looking.
Brian


#10

Here are the patents abridgements:


#11

Fede, thanks. Where did you find the drawing of the cartridge?

Hmm… now I need one of these Rydbeck rifles to go next to my 1867 Werndl…


#12

Jack, I found it in the abridgements of patents of ammunition (1855-1900) and firearms (1855-1930). There are two different sets of seven volumes each reprinted by Armory Publications.

Regards,

Fede