Sectioned 7.62x25mm Tokarev


#1

Here are a few 7.62x25mm Tokarev cartridges that I recently sectioned.

[/img]

Left to Right:

Czech Blank (bxn 59) suitable for use in 9x19mm and 7.62x25mm weapons? Note the single flash hole and smaller diameter primer.

Soviet brass cased Blank (38 73).

Soviet steel core Ball (38 ??) Post-WWII.

Soviet lead core ball with steel case (38 “A”) note how far into the projectile the “dot” type case mouth crimp goes.

Soviet lead core ball with brass case (38 44).

The one detail I add to my sectioned cartridges that I do not think anyone else does is to insert an inert substitute for the primer composition. I think this adds a lot to the finished product. I’m still working on a way to replicate the paper or foil seal over the mix and to color the mixes to replicate the originals. Some are grey, some are brown, some are bright yellow.

AKMS


#2

Very nice! I’ll have to figure out how to scan my sectioned Tokarevs.


#3

To reproduce the primer composition I use a piece of semi-circular cardboard. I colour the edge facing forward with a felt pen and glue a piece of aluminium foil on top of the cardboard piece. After trimming off any protruding foil, I insert this cardboard piece into the empty primer cap.

Chris


#4

How do you line up the flash holes when cutting the round?


#5

And how do you simulate the powder charge, and secure it so it doesn’t fall out…glue?


#6

Nice sections and photo! Thanks for sharing!!


#7

I do not know if I am permitted to discuss the details of cartridge sectioning on this forum, or to what extent it is allowed. I would be happy to discuss sectioning techniques via email though.

sweetvt(at)comcast(dot)net

AKMS


#8

Amazing job! You are a artist with skills!

Jason


#9

Thank you for the compliments! It’s all Fred Datig’s fault. The first cartridge collector books I owned were his first three volumes, full of drawings of sectioned cartridges! My first sectioned cartridge was a Soviet 5.45x39mm ball round that I think turned out pretty good even though I had no idea how the “pros” did it. It has all been self taught and over the years I have improved and figured out better ways to accomplish the various tasks required.

AKMS