Sensitive explosive or incendiary bullets in what calibers?


#1

Sorry if this violates rules, (I don’t think so because it doesn’t have to do directly with inerting) but I was reading a few threads from the archives, and they mentioned numerous things about B-Patrones and explosive bullets and how they are bad to put in bullet pullers. I am starting a small collection of pulled bullets, and if I have a duplicate I will pull the bullet. Ammo collecting is more enjoyable with all of your fingers and both of your eyes intact, so, if its okay, what are the bullet types (and the calibers they were loaded in) that should NEVER go in a puller, be they explosive or a white phossy incendiary.

I only know of the B-Patrone.

Thank you,

The newbie from ME


#2

The Japanese made some very sensitive explosive bullets for aircraft guns in WW2 (7.7x56R - .303 - and 7.7x58SR, as well as larger calibres from 12.7mm up). Some of these have PETN under a thin nose cap, which is extremely dangerous.

Russia also made some 7.62 x 54R explosive bullets intended as “spotters”, like the B-Patrone.

Explosive and/or incendiary bullets were made in some variety in WW1, mainly for aircraft use in shooting down hydrogen-filled observation balloons and airships. They were made in .303 and 7.92x57 calibres and others too.

Incendiary bullets for aircraft use were also quite common in WW2.

This is not to be taken as a complete list…the bottom line is: don’t cut into something unless you know what it is!


#3

The Japanese in the 7.7 calibers which are explosive have a flat bullet tip.

Add the 7.65 Argentine with a black bullet tip.


#4

Than there are the Israeli bullets that contain tear gas.
White phosphorus “tracer” bullets that are sealed by the case neck or some paint on the side (British and Italian 303’s)

IOW no need to cry about your collection, or to burn the house down either


#5

The Italian 7.7mm (.303) incendiaries are very easy to spot.

They have four holes in the bullet tip covered by foil. They come with a either a green or blue coloured tip. One colour indicates white phosporous filling, and the other is thermite. Sorry I can’t remember which is which.

Another member may be able to post photos as I don’t have these in my collection.


#6

[quote=“Falcon”]The Italian 7.7mm (.303) incendiaries are very easy to spot.

They have four holes in the bullet tip covered by foil. They come with a either a green or blue coloured tip. One colour indicates white phosporous filling, and the other is thermite. Sorry I can’t remember which is which.

Another member may be able to post photos as I don’t have these in my collection.[/quote]

Here you go I am not sure where the photo came from but here they are

Rich


#7

Is it not true that the 7.65 x 54 Mauser with purple tip is an Especial Concurso (Match) loading, and the Observation rounds have a black tip ??

Randy


#8

[quote=“Falcon”]The Italian 7.7mm (.303) incendiaries are very easy to spot.

They have four holes in the bullet tip covered by foil. They come with a either a green or blue coloured tip. One colour indicates white phosporous filling, and the other is thermite. Sorry I can’t remember which is which.

Another member may be able to post photos as I don’t have these in my collection.[/quote]

Blue indicates white phosphorous, green indicates thermite.
Gregg


#9

Randy
You are 100% correct. Thanks for the correction.
Most of these I’ve seen have a somewhat light coloring and not a dead-black like the US AP & somehow I was thinking of a dark violet or purple color. Anyhow that’s my excuse.
I’ll correct the original post.


#10

Yes, Pete…More like an ink than a paint and not as opaque or “solid” like a US AP…

Randy


#11

And don’t forget the austrian loadings of a B-patrone-like bullet (8x50?). A fellow collector here lost his kinetic puller some years ago on one.
Soren


#12

All the above is excellent information, and safety is a legitimate concern. No need to be paranoid, but every need to be alert and cautious.

The odds of a beginning collector in the U.S. randomly acquiring any of these loadings is probably near zero. Probably far less than being struck by lightning or being hit by a car.

Better advice might be to be aware that such loads exist, and reviewing their characteristics above, be alert for anything that seems out of the ordinary, and post here to seek positive ID before pulling or cutting it.

It might be a good public service to post a sticky somewhere both here and on the IAA reference section-
“WARNING- POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS SMALL ARMS LOADINGS” with the above items listed with photos.


#13

I posted this photo some time ago after a friend had tried to dismantle a WW2 B-patrone and now would be a good time to show it again…


#14

A box label, with three rounds from the box showing the dark purplish cast which gave me the wrong impression & an example of the FYA headstamp.


Actually John I don’t think the odds against a beginning collector are very bad in finding items like this. Perhaps the Japanese flat tipped 7.7’s but the Italian .303’s and the 7.65 Argentine are relatively easy as bunches were imported. None the less an IAA public service massage is a great idea.


#15

In Spain exist Semi Jacket Hollow Point Bullets with explosive charge in 7,92x57 for hunting(!!!). The cartridges with explosiv charge have a red tip…the normal Bullets without explosive have a green tip.
The inner construction from the explosive Bullet is similar the german B-Patrone.




#16

[quote=“mausernut”]And don’t forget the austrian loadings of a B-patrone-like bullet (8x50?). A fellow collector here lost his kinetic puller some years ago on one.
Soren[/quote]

Are you sure with the 8x50,

I know the 8x56 with a black tip made in 44.
The Problem with this round is, it Looks like a Tracer.

Rgds


#17

[quote=“dutch”][quote=“mausernut”]And don’t forget the austrian loadings of a B-patrone-like bullet (8x50?). A fellow collector here lost his kinetic puller some years ago on one.
Soren[/quote]Are you sure with the 8x50, I know the 8x56 with a black tip made in 44. The Problem with this round is, it Looks like a Tracer. Rgds[/quote]I was in doubt, thats why I put a question mark after the caliber. Btw one of the first 7.9 cartridges I got for my ‘collection’ was in fact a B-patrone. It rattles, so is kept in a vibration free place. Just to be sure…
-Soren


#18

That is wise; I also keep my cartridges out of my bedroom. -:)


#19

Don’t forget the 8x56R a black tip bullet is HE.


#20

You can’t always thrust tip color to identify the loading either. I got a belt of 7.9 x 57 with no tip color, but noticed rattling from the bullet while handeling them.