Shotshell with tied shot


#1

I have seen an italian made shotshell loaded with shot tied togheter with steel wire.Have other countries ever made shotshells so loaded?I think it is higly possible


#2

I’ve seen several versions of these loaded for the “specialty” ammunition market, but they’re looked at as more of a novelty than as anything useful. In North America, you usually hear them called “bolo shot” (from the Spanish “bolas”, the “throwing lasso” that South American cowboys use to capture running cattle). The idea comes from the “chain shot” that sailing ships would use to try to tear down another ships masts, rigging and sails.


#3

I think they were used to permit a good pattern density at long distances instead of barrel chokes.Did you see factory loaded ammo or homemade rounds only?


#4

Did you see this Italian round?

Regards,
Vince


#5

Yes,I was talking about the same round


#6

This kind of loading is a patent of a French guy called DE KROGEVINKO.
He was of Russian origin and came to settle down in Nice.
French shells were loaded with this loading and it doesn’t surprised me Martignoni shells were also loaded with it (Martignoni is about one hour from Nice)
JP


#7

HI jean-Pierre, from when is this patent. I have got an old pre WW II shell made by LB whit tied buck. This looks much older than the Martignoni variation.
Rene


#8

[quote=“rene”]HI jean-Pierre, from when is this patent. I have got an old pre WW II shell made by LB whit tied buck. This looks much older than the Martignoni variation.
Rene[/quote]
Hi ren


#9

Hi strakv

I think your round is missing the closing card at the top of the case.The one I have seen has a purple card with 3 rings stamped on it

Pivi


#10

I’ve been doing research on shot concentrators and spreaders working on a book of same. the first US patent with stringed shot was by William E. Boyd of Selma, Alabama dated Aug 24, 1886 with patent no. 317,988. I am not sure of whether it was manufactured about that time. There is a Wilkinson patent of 1876 that linked shot with wire pins running between the wads.

Ernest Wingert a custom loader produced a “Controlled Spread” load and marked the topwad “CS”. The buckshot are held together by heavy string.

The Boyd patent is cited in many new patents for what is called “fettered shot”. One of these patents came out in the 1980 for use against helicopter and air assault troops.

A really good site can be found at google “google patents” for all kinds of US patents. I believe British and other countries patents may also be on the Web but I haven’t delved into them yet and still use the reprints of British patents by Museum Restoration Services or by Hoyem. Check out the Boyd patent by searching either name, date, or patent number.