Silicone 'gun wipes' and cartridges


#1

Are silicon gun wipes appropriate for cleaning and preventing corrosion on cartridges?
I know that the wipes do bring up old grubby cartridges quite nicely but does it have any long term effect?
It doesn’t polish them but keeps the ‘aged’ patina and seems to protect from general staining from handling cartridges. Obviously it is best to keep away from paper patched projectiles and card/paper shells but what about primer annulus and case mouth seals, case colours, coloured tips and plastic cartridges/tips? Will it damage them?
I know that the Remington branded ‘RemWipes’ have a distillate product in them and are flammable so I wouldnt put them anywhere near cartridges but a lot of others seem to just be the silicon.

I have read quite a few different accounts on care for collections but never seen these silicon based products mentioned.


#2

Bump…
Fixed spelling too - silicone not silicon
Any ideas or comments?
The only real discussion I found was on a sword forum and they seemed to be happy that there were no visible ill effects.
The difference with cartridges is with the variety of different materials used to make or mark cartridges and how they might be affected.


#3

I use a silicone spray which I obtain from a DIY store - I don’t want to go out to the shed at the moment to check but I think it’s called Flo-past. I believe it’s intended as a lubricant for people who work with plastic pipework & fittings but it works a treat on my cartridges.
For years I’ve despaired when the inevitable finger stains have appeared on my brass and I tried all sorts to prevent this, nothing really worked well until I found the silicone. It dries in seconds to a totally invisible layer, it doesn’t mark paper or cardboard so if your cartridges are laid out in a drawer you can spray them all in situ. If you wish to spray a large quantity in one go put your cartridges into a plastic bag, spray a long burst of silicone into the bag and hold the top shut for a minute or so. It certainly works for me…


#4

Thanks, that is some good info.
I have found the version I use, which is just a silicone impregnated cloth to be very easy. It just sits in a zip lock bag on the top of the cabinet ready to use on new additions or if anything looks like it needs a quick wipe.


#5

I just noticed there are some wipes from a company called Bullfrog that are safe for brass, lead and copper. They are called Rusthunter gun wipes and are meant to be wiped all over a gun to inhibit rust or corrosion. The website’s application chart shows which metals it is safe for: http://www.bull-frog.com/products/metal_chart.php The lowest price I could find was at Impact Guns: http://www.impactguns.com/store/767742923836.html There are allot of other “gun wipes” made by Hoppes, Birchwood-Casey, and Remington, but none of those are clear on whether they are safe on brass, copper and lead like the Bullfrog Rusthunter wipes are. I guess as far as penetrative ability, and affect on tip colors or sealers, one would be wise to test things out on some fodder cartridges to gauge the results.


#6

DK and others - please humor me. I know I spell a lot of words wrong on the Forum - usually typos as I spell fairly well, but not always so. I correct them later if notice them.

There is one word used improperly on this Forum that, for some reason, makes me crazy.

Allot - to allocate; example: Please allot three men and two powder-sniffing dogs to find John’s lost cartridge.

A lot - one lot; one group; many.

“We will allot a lot of ammunition to that squad.”

Ask Jason how much this bothers me. Sorry to be a nit-picker.
It just that this one makes my head explode!


#7

You’re right of course John, and I feel dumb now for not having that correct. I blame the software spellchecker since it keeps suggesting that I add an L when I only used one L after typing “alot”, which is also wrong. Now I’ll have to go through my book and search out all the instances of “allot” - which there are probably a dozen of. Another one that was pointed out to me recently which spell-checkers don’t get is the use of “material” in terms of the phrase “anti-material” which of course should have an E instead of A near the end of it to be “anti-materiel”. Spell checkers don’t know the difference.