Skeet vs Trap


#1

May someone remind/educate me on ammo difference between these sister sports. I realize that one is “from left to right” and another “from me to as far away as possible” but do they really need different loads? I tried both but gravitate to rifles. Thanks aforehand.



#2

trap shooters prefer #8 or#7.5 shot size . The distances that the target is broken is longer in trap and many shooter feel the heavier shot size makes for more consistant breaks. Many trap shooters are going to #8 for more pellets on target and reduced loads 1 ounce or even 7/8oz. for 16 yard trap. Handicap shooters are more likely to use the 1 1/8oz. loads because the yardages may up to 27 from the trap.
Skeet targets are 26 yards avge for most shooters from gun to target. #9’s are sufficient for clean breaks in skeet. Again many shooters are shooting lighter loads in all gauges. Recoil and economy. If you are not getting beat up by heavy 1 1/8 Ounce 12ga. loads you will shoot better. last years Doubles trap champion at the Nationals (trap) shot 7/8 ounce cylinder bore #9’s on the first shot and 1 1/8 oz #8’s Skeet choke for the second shot. He is so fast the second target is broken at about 10 yards from the trap house. He won with a 100 straight. 1 1/8oz. 1200fps loads will beat you up over a 100-200 target event out of an over/under.


#3

They really are two different sports, and most serious competitive shotgunners are either one or the other, seldom both. As stated, the main difference between Trap and Skeet shells is the shot size, but I have known skeet shooters who prefer using 7-1/2 or 8 shot over #9. Many skeet shooters who reload their own shells prefer using reclaimed and cleaned previously-fired shot of mixed sizes. I always did, as I could shoot better skeet scores with it. Skeet shooters have events in 4 gauges (12, 20, 28, and .410), and open choked guns are the norm. Trap shooters normally use only 12 gauge guns with tight chokes.


#4

I don’t know why anyone would want to shoot those pretty little skeets. We have some in our front yard that we feed. They are almost like pets.

Ray


#5

How does one reclaim previously fired shots? I assume we are talking about BB’s.


#6

Vlad
The pellets are called “shot” (IE: skeet shot, bird shot, buck shot).
“BB” can be a couple different things, one being a steel ball of .177" diameter for use in “BB” guns, the other being a specific size of pellet (it’s one of the “duck/goose” shot sizes)
I’ve seen pavement sweepers (tractor / bobcat mounted rotary brush) used to clean skeet/trap fields. Screen the sweepings to separate the broken clay & wads from the shot.


#7

Vlad

Trap and skeet ranges are built according to uniform specs. So, it’s fairly easy to outline broad areas where the spent shot falls back to earth. As Bob said, special sweepers and/or vacuums can scoop up a big majority of the shot. It’s then winnowed and screened to eliminate grass, twigs, broken clay birds, wads, and feathers from the skeets. It can be used or sold as is, or further screened to seperate into the various sizes. It can be a money-maker for the range owners.

With today’s government intrusion into every aspect of our lives, it’s getting harder for some ranges to reclaim shot (or bullets). You have to get special permits and hire hazmat crews with special protective clothing and equipment which can eat up any profit. That’s assuming you can even get permission to begin with.

Years ago we would hire young kids to dig up lead bullets from the backstop of our local rifle range. They made a few bucks and the rifle club sold the lead for scrap. If we tried that today we’d be sent the federal penitentary in Kansas.