Small game : brench loading rifle


#1

In which year was designed the first brench loading rifle ??? C:=)

jp


#2

There are surviving specimens of breech-loading wheellock rifles from at least as early as the seventeenth century. Jack


#3

Hum !! an expert !

yes Jack !!

could you provide the exact year and name of the guy ?

jp


#4

jp

There are known examples of breechloaders dating back even further - to the 16th Century. It’s hard to come up with names and addresses going that far back, but there is supposedly a breechloader introduced by Henry VIII in 1537 that is/was in the Tower Museum. I believe there was also a matchlock revolving rifle that had a cylinder very much like revolvers and revolving rifles of modern times. Those early designs were not very practical because of the inability to effectively seal the breech.

What is your estimate of the earliest???

Ray


#5

There were Breech Loading Falconettes already in the time of Henry VIII
of England ( for swivel gun use on ships and fortress walls. The mechanism was a Wedge Locked Breech Piece, firing by taper ( Linstock) or early matchlock. Construction in Wrought Iron. Because of loose breech seal, firing these was a risky Business, but the breech feature made for faster Reloading in a Combat situation. The Wedging Block system did reduce the gas escape somewhat.

But I would not call these ( calibre 1 inch or bigger) as “rifles” more “Wall Guns”, even though they had a stock-shaped “tiller” to assist in swivelling and aiming.

Falconettes were also used on wheeled mounts, like a light Artillery Piece ( late 1400s and early 1500s – Landsknechts in Europe).

Regards,
Doc AV


#6

Sory to have taken so much time to carry on ths topic, in fact I forgot it !!

First Doc Av is right, falconettes are big guns (canons), not rifles
Second I am not talking of matchlock rifles but of rifles using percussion caps

JP


#7

[quote=“jeanpierre”]Sory to have taken so much time to carry on ths topic, in fact I forgot it !!

First Doc Av is right, falconettes are big guns (canons), not rifles
Second I am not talking of matchlock rifles but of rifles using percussion caps

JP[/quote]
The Rev James Forsyth patented the first percussion system in 1806 but it met with total apathy. It didn’t start to catch on until the 1840s but you can take 1806 as the date from which a few were made but they were muzzle loaders.

The devil is in the detail because there were so many transitional systems around. Cap and ball could be described as breech loading although they are generally assumed to be muzzle loaders. It depends how you view changable cylinders Probably the needle fire systems but its hard to be specific.( Pauly 1808 and Dreyse 1836) The Dreyse system was adopted by Prussia in 1848 but not used in anger until the Franco -Prussian war of 1866

The Maynard system was a half and half.(1845 and 1851) The ACW is generally considered to be the pivitol era when breech loaders were first used in anger but it depends to some extent on your point of view and which country you live in.


#8

There were many percussion cap (separate primed) breechloaders used just prior to and during the American Civil War, such as the Sharps, Smith, and Burnside. I don’t know if I would count Col. Colt’s products as breechloaders or not. I would think those of the Dreyse needle-fire type are among the earliest, if not the earliest, percussion breechloaders, but they are not actually separate primed. I’d say the US Hall rifle might be very close to the earliest of the type. It had the added benefit that the breech could be (and was, during the Mexican War) removed and carried as a pistol. Early ones were flintlock, later, percussion cap.

Let’s not forget the British Ferguson breechloader ca. late 1700s. It was a flintlock, but could have been percussion had percussion caps been invented a few decades earlier.