Some 7,92 head stamps need help


#1

Recently I


#2

The manufacturers are: Sorry I can’t help on the other case features.

  1. Metallwarenfabrik Treuenbritzen G.m.b.H., Werk Selterhof, Germany

  2. Pre


#3

Thank you very much Falcon!


#4

#5: АТЗ = Войни Текники Завод (hope I spelled it correctly going back into Cyrillic from the tranliterated English “Voini Tekniki Zavod”). My reference gives the translation as "Military Technical Factory although I’m not sure that first is exactly correct. Yugoslav - Kragujevac.

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#5

[quote=“Iconoclast”]#5: АТЗ = Войни Текники Завод (hope I spelled it correctly going back into Cyrillic from the tranliterated English “Voini Tekniki Zavod”). My reference gives the translation as "Military Technical Factory although I’m not sure that first is exactly correct. Yugoslav - Kragujevac.

.[/quote]

Thank you! Very interesting what Yugoslavian ammo did on German positions ner Petersburg. I guess captured plants should use new head stamps… so it was trophy ammo I guess.

Translation is correct but I’m not sure what letter A is “Voini”.


#6

I agree; should be ‘В’ . . . my reference source (Hogg) may be incorrect . . . I’ve seen others mention various errors.

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#7

The makers’ marks ATZ and VTZ were both used by Kragujevac, the change occuring about 1932; I don’t have my references at hand so can’t say which was the earlier form. I believe ATZ represents Artillery Technical Factory but will not insist on that reading of the initials. JG


#8

[quote=“Yuri Bushin”][quote=“Iconoclast”]#5: АТЗ = Войни Текники Завод (hope I spelled it correctly going back into Cyrillic from the tranliterated English “Voini Tekniki Zavod”). My reference gives the translation as "Military Technical Factory although I’m not sure that first is exactly correct. Yugoslav - Kragujevac.

.[/quote]

Thank you! Very interesting what Yugoslavian ammo did on German positions ner Petersburg. I guess captured plants should use new head stamps… so it was trophy ammo I guess.

Translation is correct but I’m not sure what letter A is “Voini”.[/quote]

Many Yugoslav units were allied with the Wehrmacht and fought on the Eastern front. This was especially true of the Croats who formed many units including air forces.


#9

That would make a LOT more sense with the “A.”

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#10

ЮРИЙ
а вы не пробовали посмотреть по маркировкам на наших сайтах
есть Тризна - специальный раздел по патронам
куча ссылок на все сайты
сайт ВВ2
А под Питером попадаются 7.92 и югославы и чехи и поляки и белгийцы
в различных вариантах .


#11

The various factory initials were:

C X C = S Kh S Headstamps 1928 - 1929 Stands for Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.

A T 3 = A T Z Headstamps 1929 - 1932 Stands for Artiljerisko Tehnicki Zavod (Atrtillery Technical Factory)

B T 3 = V T Z Headstamps 1932 - 1941 Stands for Vojno (or Voini) Tehnicki Zavod (Military Technical Factory)

The Yugoslav names are transliterations from Cyrillic, and different spellings may be seen. These are the sequence of the headstamp initials found on Yugoslav ammunition from this factory at Kragujevac from 1928 until 1941. Yugo ammunition of this caliber was contracted from out of the country before 1928, mostly from Fabrique Nationale d’Armes de Guerre, Herstal, Belgium. The “FN” on the headstamp was in Cyrillic letters. There seems to have been no production after 1941 until approximately 1948, of this caliber, when the Arsenal was using the communist numerical system code “11.” I have 9mm Para made as early as 1946, so it is possible production started then, but I have not seen a 7.9 x 57 earlier than 1948, myself.


#12

[quote=“AV66”]ЮРИЙ
а вы не пробовали посмотреть по маркировкам на наших сайтах
есть Тризна - специальный раздел по патронам
куча ссылок на все сайты
сайт ВВ2
А под Питером попадаются 7.92 и югославы и чехи и поляки и белгийцы
в различных вариантах .[/quote]

They would not let me post the fact that Babelfish blows BUT here is the proof. This is what babelfish says this Russian post means.

“YURI and you did not try to look on the markings on our sites there is a funeral feast - special division on the cartridges the heap of references to all sites site VV2 A under Pieter fall 7.92 both Yugoslavs and Czechs and Poles and belgiytsy in the diverse variants.”

Can someone translate this in English ?


#13

Excuse
It was only a question to Yuri
And I had a problem to write it on English


#14

@AV66:
If you wish to communicate only to an individual, especially in a language other than English, please use the PM or eMail options.

@CSAEOD:
My Russian is very rusty, but a rough amateur translation follows:

Yuri
And you didn’t try to look for these markings on our sites?

There is a Тризна [color=blue](must be a colloquial usage as Babblefish did translate it correctly - transLITERation would suggest “treatise” although this not the Russian word for that)[/color] - a special section on cartridges.

There are a heap [color=blue](colloquial - we’d use “bunch”)[/color] of references on all sites [color=blue](presumably in reference to battlefields or eras, not web sites)[/color].

Site VV2 [color=blue]i[/i][/color].

And near [color=blue]i[/i][/color] St. Petersburg you get [color=blue]i[/i][/color] many variations of Yugoslav, Czech, Polish and Belgian 7.92.

Hope this helps - not exact, but close enough, I suspect.

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#15

[quote=“Iconoclast”]@AV66:
If you wish to communicate only to an individual, especially in a language other than English, please use the PM or eMail

.[/quote]

Well, it was once only
I wanted to write in English but had problems with the computer translator

Тризна \Trizna\ -it is the name of archeologic group for WW2 and a name of forum on their site
trizna.ru/


#16

Thank you for trying to post in English. The Babelfish doesn’t work well for this kind of communication.

When Germany invaded Yugoslavia they captured nearly a 350,000 man army and their equipment. Many of these soldiers went into German service also with their equipment. These troops were later supplied from German supply lines and this may be the reason that production was stopped in Yugoslavia PLUS there was a great deal of sabotage and partizan activity in parts of Yugoslavia other than Croatia. The Croats were more enthusiastic than other parts of the country about supporting Germany.


#17

[quote=“AV66”][quote=“Iconoclast”]@AV66:
If you wish to communicate only to an individual, especially in a language other than English, please use the PM or eMail.[/quote]
Well, it was once only[/quote]
Understood and I’m sure no one was offended (nor did I intend any offense) - simply a matter of not blurring the lines between public and private communications.

[quote=“AV66”]I wanted to write in English but had problems with the computer translator

Тризна \Trizna\ -it is the name of archeologic group for WW2 and a name of forum on their site
trizna.ru/[/quote]
Thanks for the explanation! I’ve book-marked the site.

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