Soviet 130mm Case Manufacturer ID


#1

Today one of my lecturers at college bought this case in for me to ID. He bought it in an antique shop in Syria on Christmas day in 1991 or 1992 (he can’t remember which) when he was working there in the Oil Fields. We have been told that the Arabic inscription is the “Ayat al Kursi” or “Vesre of the Throne”, which is the Islamic equivalent of the Lord’s Prayer. He was told that she shell may have been fired during one of the three Arab-Israeli wars.

The headstamp is: “130” over an upside-down flattened “T” above a circle at 12 0’Clock, “88” at 3 O’clock. These are the only stamps that look to be machine made. At 9 O’Clock there is “12” over “74” over “195” clearly stamped by hand. In the segment between 3 and 6 O’Clock there are many small acceptance stamps, which are also hand made and not very clear. From the information posted can anyone tell me the name of he arsenal where it was made, and which of these markings are the date code. I will post a photo of the headstamp tomorrow. Any info would be helpful.


#2

Falcon, ist it possible to get an image of the head stamp?


#3

The headstamp wouldn’t show up in a photo, so I drew an accurate 1:1 scale hand drawing of it. I will try and scan it in tomorrow then post it.


#4

Here is a drawing of the headstamp:


#5
  • @ Falcon: The headstamp markings show: “130” (No. of charge); “12” (shell case lot number) over “74” (two digit date of the year of shell case manufacture - 1974); “195” (unknown to me); “88” (shell case maker’s code, State Plant # 88). Those small markings stamped below the primer show the “stamp of the military control department” and the markings stamped around the 4 and 5 o’clock position may be “reloading marks”. Too bad the primer is not in place to give us more info. Liviu 06/14/08

#6

Thanks Liviu. I know now a date of 1974 makes it too late for the last Arab-Israeli war. Where in the USSR was state plant 88 located?


#7

They didn’t call military plants in the USSR as “state plant #00” since mid 1960s. They still use codes connected with such old names of plants on the cartriges, but not on the shell case. Soviet plant #88 never produced shell cases. It was a name of gun plant in Moscow vicinity within 1942-1946. Later it was first Soviet rocket plant.


#8
  • @ linnet: It is correct, Russian State plant “88” manufactured artillery items until 1946 and later made long-range missiles under NII-88 [“Energiya” Corp.]. “Falcon” should check very carefully and see if it is stamped “88” or something else. Liviu 06/14/08

#9

Why should the case not be stamped “88”?

Every Warsaw Pact country was giving it’s own codes to it’s own plants regardless what other treaty countries did. So as we know well from small arms ammo (and other ordnance) codes may duplicate.

So connecting one code to one country should not be the first choice as many times observed.

To avoid confusion some countries even applied differently shaped “frames” around the codes to indicate the county the code was from (but not always and not all countries).
Bulgaria for example used a double circle, Poland an oval, China sometimes triangles, others “barrels”, squares etc. Unfortunately I do not know of a complete list.


#10

[quote=“EOD”]Why should the case not be stamped “88”?

Every Warsaw Pact country was giving it’s own codes to it’s own plants regardless what other treaty countries did. So as we know well from small arms ammo (and other ordnance) codes may duplicate.

So connecting one code to one country should not be the first choice as many times observed.

To avoid confusion some countries even applied differently shaped “frames” around the codes to indicate the county the code was from (but not always and not all countries).
Bulgaria for example used a double circle, Poland an oval, China sometimes triangles, others “barrels”, squares etc. Unfortunately I do not know of a complete list.[/quote]
Shell case can be stamped “88”. But it wasn’t mean “Plant #88” (old name) in 1970s. It’s just code name for example for Tula “Stamp” Plant (#187 (or #176?) old name).
But “188” on cartridge means old name Plant #188 in Novosibirsk.
It’s a different.


#11
  • In this case it’s very important to see the headstamp markings, not only a drawing. For example the 2 markings stamped below the primer [showing the stamps of the military control department] look almost identical with the markings stamped inside of eack link of a 10-round non-disintegrating empty steel belt I have [for the 14.5X114 rimless rounds]. Unfortunately I don’t know which country manufactured the 10-round steel belt I have. I’m not sure now if this big shell case is of Russian manufacture, actually I don’t think it is. A precise identification of the country which manufactured this shell case can be made by identifying first the origin of both markings located below the primer. Liviu 06/14/08

#12
  • @ Falcon: How tall is that 130mm shell case??? NOTE: From what I know, there are 3 types of 130mm guns: —> A) 130mm M-1955 [KS-30] heavy AA gun used by North Vietnam; —> B) 130mm Coastal Gun used by the former Soviet Union and Egypt; —> C) M-1946 130mm Field Gun used by Bulgaria, China, East Germany [former “DDR”], Egypt, Finland, India, Iraq, Mongolia, Nigeria, North Korea, North Vietnam, Pakistan, Poland, former Soviet Union, Syria and former Yugoslavia. => I have a feeling this 130mm shell case is for the M-1946 Field Gun and it was reloaded in Egypt or another Arab country from Middle East. Liviu 06/14/08

#13

This is the 140x845mm Case for the 130mm M46 Field Gun.


#14

Liviu, many many more countries have used/are using the M-46. Not to forget those countries not using the weapon system but making/offering this ammunition for international export like PRB in Belgium.
Iran is also making this ammunition including improved versions of the original Russian pattern shells.