Soviet PMP Mine?


#1

Any mine collectors here? If so, do any of you have an example of the Soviet PMP AP mine that fires a 7.62x25 Tokarev cartridge?


#2

Actually the PMP is one of the scarcest mines. There are hardly propper images of these around and specimen known to actually exist are not more than 1-2 or so.
In most countries it would be considered a firearm and probably also a landmine when not deactivated.


#3

Of course it is! It could never be possible for me to try to find something common and readily available. ;)


#4

Yes, why should be bother with “normal” stuff…

For all those not into landmines here a diagram of the item in question:


#5

#11 is probably just a standard 7.62 Tokarev ball round, but the only image if an example that I’ve seen had some very distinctive case markings.


#6

Yes a 7.62mm TT round. The ones with ink markings on the case wall are so far only mentioned in one document (non military). By now no photo has surfaced.
Also I wonder if there was a necessity to make a different load and mark it separetely then.


#7

The marking might only have been for engineers, so that they know what mine the cartridges work with.


#8

The featured marking is just a lot number and there one of a factory (Krasnozavodsk) which is not making any small arms ammo.
Knowing Soviet engineer ammo fairly well (as I had to clear such stuff and studied it beyond most people’s imagination) I doubt this marking practice. At best a marking would indicate the type of mine it goes with but that makes no sense too as the mine came as a unit ready to use. Otherwise more own soldiers would have died from fondling and installing this mine than enemies would have got shot their foot.

Maybe the meager effect of this mine caused it’s withdrawal from service.

After all I would like to see good and legit images of complete mines (not being tampered with, restored, repainted, “touched up” and what ever simple minded people think they have to do to make items look prettier than when they were new), the packing material and one disassembled to see what the cartridge inside is marked like if so.

Even Russian mine and engineer munition collectors have no examples in their collections.


#9

Here is a picture of the PMP mine and a different drawing taken from an engineer’s manual dated 1976.


#10

Here some digital renderings and the data from the known Russian manuals. Just in Russian:

saper.etel.ru/mines/pmp.html