Soviet SKS charger markings

I bumped into a bunch of them, mostly “3TK” Технички Завод Крагуjевац. Maybe of interest for someone. Rounds are all “ИК 1981”.

DSCF3264 DSCF3265

These are Russian/Soviet.
Kraguyevac was long gone by the time Yugoslavia started making 7.62x39.

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Thanks. So what does “3TK” mean? I saw a vague “55” stamp on one of them. Would that be a year?

I think it’s an acceptance stamp; the TK part may stand for ‘technical control’ or similar, but don’t bet the farm on it (as they say). I have one of these that I’ve had since before 1970. Jack

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It is said to be “Zavod Tula Korovina” (ZTK), one of the old logos of TPZ/TCW.

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Was “Korovina” a reference to a gun designer Sergey Korovin http://www.museum-arms.ru/about/tula-armory/detail.php?ELEMENT_ID=2364 who also worked at Tula factory?

Exactly !

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The identification for “ZTK” given in Russian sources is “Tula Plant named after Kirov” (Завод Тульский имени Кирова).

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Fede you are correct, I mixed up Kirov and Korovin!

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Btw, the Yugoslav stripper clips I know of are all unmarked.

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There was a time when SKS chargers were available in large quantities from dealers and at British militaria shows, along with a lot of other Eastern European equipment … probably taken from Russian stocks found in warehouses after Russian forces “went home”. Much of this stuff was junk of no great collectors interest but it filled out otherwise pretty empty tables …







… I mean, how many of these things does a sane person need ?

Pete

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Much of a question how you’ll define sanity.
So the numbers may quite vary.

And also one needs to consider if that person is owning a SKS and a truckload of ammo.

Peter: Any pattern to blued versus phosphate finish? My only Russian specimen (which resembles your last example) is blued, as is one Chinese, factory 31, with very Viet Namese looking rust. Jack

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How does Vietnamese rust look like? Any pictures?

I’m sure Vietnamese iron oxide looks pretty much like anyone else’s, but a fair number of ferrous souvenirs that found their way from VN to the US were pretty rusty. In my case it’s this one clip, and also an SKS cleaning kit. Jack

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None that I can see, the majority that have passed through my hands have been blued.



As it happens, I have Factory 31 chargers with both finishes so this might have been a process that varied over time or according to the wishes of the final user.


The only other case of a maker using both finishes that I have is Factory 619 (plain-text and stylised markings), but I’ve no way of knowing if other factories didn’t change their finish too.


As always with these things there is a complete absence of information so we can only use examples in collections as a basis for any judgements we might make, which is where collectors can add to the sum of knowledge … the only thing I can say for certain is that I’ve never seen a “BXN” Sellier & Bellot charger with anything other than a blued finish, but that doesn’t mean that I might be wrong.

Pete

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Peter, I am not sure what I saw but there is a BXN68 which looks completely unplated.
But I am not sure if somebody ran it through his case tumbler or so.

Alex, an unplated charger is an unprotected charger and that doesn’t sound quite right, all sorts of preservatives and coating are used fior military equipment to ensure they don’t deteriorate in storage.

I did forget to mention that chromed SKS chargers were once available on the internet, but only from the sort of places that deal with key-rings and “fashion” belted inerted cartridges … I thought about buying one as many SKS rifles have been chromed for ceremonial and parade duties, but they were quite expensive so I passed them by.

I do have a chromed Enfield 0,303" charger as I know from my bayonet collecting days that the Brigade of Guards here in the UK chromed everything made from metal for parade use, I still have an Enfield No4 spike bayonet that came with a white parade belt-frog.

Pete

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Peter, of course I can not tell. The one I am speaking of dioes not show any rust (by now). Maybe it has some alternative coating like being boiled in oil or having some other plating that looks like steel or so.
Or an ultra thin layer of cadmium or, or, or…

This morning I managed to recall the Soviet period Russian acronym I was trying to get a handle on in my first post above. The initialism OTK stood for Otdel Tekhnicheskogo Kontrola and said marking can be, I believe, found in a Soviet ordnance context. Jack