Special ammunition only for sd weapon PSDR3

My information about this box and cartridges
Speer 45 auto cases with long bullet for special revolver used by Airport police in Dusseldorf.
Box came with 2 cartridges - black bullet
5 cartridges with gold bullet
Last picture has a 45 acp with Creedmore headstamp to show overall cartridge length difference.
Cartridges could not be fired in 45 auto pistol, only PSDR3 45 acp revolver.
Comments and corrections are welcome.
45%20Rev%20NRW%20Police
45%20Rev%20NRW%20Police%20a
45%20Rev%20NRW%20Police%20b 45%20Rev%20NRW%20Police%20c

Bob - Thanks for posting this box label. I have the same two rounds (black bullet and gold-color bullet), which I picked up years ago. With the label, it is nice to know the bullet weight and velocity. I knew they were for a revolver, but didn’t realize it was one with a Schalldämpfer (Silencer) on it. That is what the “SD” stands for in the designation “SD Waffe PSDR3.” Its also nice to know who loaded them - evidently Peters GmbH. Do you know what “NRW” stands for, or the actual meaning of “NRW LAB K500?”

John Moss

Gentlemen,
NRW means Nord-Rheinwestfalen which is a state of Germany. That corresponds to the handwritten on top.
I would assume that the LAB means Laborierung which describes the load.
Just adding that the bullets are made by Haendler & Nattermann, Hann. Münden, Germany.
The bullets are defined as BRK Blei-Rundkopf, Lead round nose.

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Desperado - thank you for the added information. I actually have a box, with some of the bullets left, from Haendler & Natterman. They, too, are for .45 Auto, but meant for use in self-loading pistols. They are shorter and lighter than the bullets for the SD Waffe PSDR3, but are lead round-nose, with a slightly flattened meplat, and are coated with a black-color substance.

John Moss

John,

I use the H&N bullets for most of my reloads as they are quit well available here.
If I remember correctly they used the blackish coating in the past as a kind of lubrication possibly Teflon based. The other bullets, the orange ones are the newer so called high speed coating covered with a clear laquer for protection. The reason for that coating is to prevent lead fumes to come off the bullet when it is fired. In Germany we mostly have indoor ranges so it is a matter of health for the shooters. In this regard it is interesting that these bullets are used in police ammo. Are they just for training purpose or also for duty?
Today I had a look on the H&N home page loocking for these bullets. The heaviest I could find were 250gr but different in shape.

Cheers

Jo

John,
my opinion is that the line LAB NRW K500 describes the type of load:
LAB = Laborierung (type of load)
NRW K500 = the name of the load, where NRW is for Nordrhein-Westfalen [police]

To all:
if you google “PSDR3 pistol” [yes pistol, although its a revolver] you will find information regarding this Heath-Robinson modification of a S&W revolver.

Silly side question:
Back in the days of the western expansion and cowboys, handguns were referred to as “Pistols” and those that wielded them were “pistoleros”. Samuel Colt even called his designs “Pistols”.
When/why did it become stylish to separate Autoading Pistols from Revolving Pistols?
I realise the opening of a can of worms, and feel free to delete if it is inapropriate…

It’s worth mentioning that the PSDR III (Peters Schalldämpfer-Revolver, 3. Version) was originally conceived as a revolver but was later modified to became a revolving carbine. Here is a picture from 1995:

1995

Interesting topic-Thanks!

Does anyone know if his Peters GmbHin Paderborn is the same company as Peters Arms in Hamburg that produced the attached catalog which is apparently from the 1930s?

Cheers,
Lew

Peters1.pdf (5.1 MB)

Thank you for the very interesting catalog. U.S. weapons and ammunition were really expensive in Germany.

I am quite sure there is no connection, Peters being a frequent name in Germany.

The revolver Peters is in my opinion connected to Peters-Stahl, a toolmaking shop that eventually started making 1911 clones. The guns were held in high regard by German gun magazines. Alas, none of those I saw on the range functioned well. Anyway, among a considerable amount of legal battles between the people involved (a company named Hartchrom Feige also played a part) I lost track of and interest in company history.

Here are some more pictures of my full cartridge box.

Chris