Stamp on bullet's base


#1

There is many references to head stamps on cases but I have one 8 mm cartridge (TE D 40 I) and with stamp on bullet’s base:

                (LM 
                  S 
                2,34)

Well this is interesting what this stamp on bullet could mean and why it pressed on bullet if it could be read only if cartridge will be splinted?
(sorry missprint with caliber)


#2

This are 8mm french Lebel Ball-D bullets.
TE - Cartoucherie de Toulouse
D - Soci


#3

Thank you! I was able identity TE D 1 but could examine bullet only after extraction from case. Is it normal situation stamps on bullet’s base? I haven’t seen such on any other WW2 cartridges extracted by our “diggers” from Russian grounds.


#4

We in Britain also stamped our bullets with a manufacturers code, 'though not as elaborate as that of the French. UK .303" bullets had a stamp into the lead which served two purposes, it identified the origin of the bullet and it indicated to the inspector that the bullet was correctly pressed. If insufficient pressure had been applied to the base the mark would not be clear, this could indicate a machine fault or a missing tip filler so the bullet was rejected.

Other bullets, such as .455 Webley and .380 revolver had base marks too. The inside of .303" cases also have marks at the bottom to indicate the maker of the case (which is not always the same as the headstamp).

gravelbelly


#5

Same was done to 8x57 M88 and 13mm AT rifle projectiles in Germany.


#6

EOD

There were large quantities of “clandestine” 8x57mm M88 rifles and ammunition supplied by Germany to the Irish rebels to be used against the English. The rounds have no headstamp but still have the bullet base marking!

gravelbelly


#7

30-40 Krag bullets by US makers also have markings on the bullet base, cast or stamped into the lead…W (Winchester) and US (United States Cartridge Company)…and the all bronze 8mm Lebel bullets with U (Remington-UMC)…Randy


#8

EOD

There were large quantities of “clandestine” 8x57mm M88 rifles and ammunition supplied by Germany to the Irish rebels to be used against the English. The rounds have no headstamp but still have the bullet base marking!

gravelbelly[/quote]

Good to know, I assume the single letters were not blowing the cover too much.


#9

I might as well add that this is not uncommon on 9mm bullets either. DWM, for example, stamped their bullet catalog number on the base of lots of bullets - it usually shows up as raised letters. I am sure they did it on other calibers as well, not just 9mm, but it is on that caliber that I “discovered” these markings for the first time. It caused me to pull bullets on lots of dupes, and I found other examples, as well.