Steel case 7.62x51 "LC 68" NATO - Chinese copies?


#1

I have some unusual belted 7.62x51 ammo. It’s steel cased (attracts magnet) and also has steel jacketed bullets. Are these Chinese made?

Has anyone come across these before? When were they produced? I have some of the Chinese .30 carbine with LC 52 headstamps but have never seen or heard of this ammo before.


#2

I believe the LC52 .30 Carbine and British style L2A2 steel cased 7.62 NATO were both produced in anticipation of a China backed communist insurgency in the Philippines. The operation never happened and the ammo was surplussed out. Late Sixties I think. Chinese style steel LC68 is a new one on me.


#3

jjjxlr8,

Would it be possible to get a good, sharp focus picture of a single case and headstamp? If 1968 is the actual date of production then this is in the time frame (1958 - 1972) when Frankford Arsenal was working on steel case development for the 7.62x51mm, examples of phosphate/varnish coated steel cases shown here: iaaforum.org/forum3/viewtopi … =8&t=10181. No info on copper plated (washed), bi-metal steel.

FWIW other Chinese copper clad steel cased 7.62x51mm have been discussed, one with a headstamp of " 61 92 " is discussed here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=4136.

Brian


#4

It looks to me like the rounds might have been very deeply tarnished and someone dipped them in an acid solution to get the tarnish off leaving a copper looking finish as the zinc in the outer surface was striped. Please take one of the rounds out of the links and retest with a magnet to see if it still attracts mid case. I believe you might have tested it in the links or up on the neck and received a false positive. I can see in the picture where the links have moved and it looks like brass in those spots. Also take a picture if you would of the marking/ stamping on the link.

Joe


#5

Jeremy did confirm to me that the cases are in-fact magnetic. As such, I’m leaning heavily towards PRC. The “61” headstamped rounds are obviously Chinese production, as are the “RG 60” rounds mentioned previously. In this case, as well as with the "RG’ rounds, I believe the dates are totally irrelevant, and that the Chinese simply made ammo with spurious headstamps for “unattributable” clandestine distribution.
Yeah, very sneaky. ;)


#6

I don’t see any markings on the links. Here’s a better photo of the headstamp. These cases and jackets are most certainly magnetic.



#7

Is it possible to show us a pulled bullet, the powder and a primer pocket cut open to check if it is Boxer or Berdan?


#8

Yeah, I might pull one of the ball rounds apart and check tonight… Will report back…


#9

OK, now I feel really stupid. I took a round out of the link and noticed something very odd - brass!!! Got the magnet out again and behold - non-magnetic case!!! Geez. I re-checked another case that still had the link and the magnet stuck. I guess the magnet was strong enough to appear stick to the brass because the link was in close proximity.

xjda68 called this one correctly. Sorry to everyone for my poor data collection techniques! I guess the lesson is, make sure to completely remove the cartridge from the link before testing with a magnet.


#10

The bullets do attract a magnet, though! :(


#11

A tip is to have two magnets, a weak one so you don’t have to remove links & a strong one for other applications