Strange 7.62x51 dummy


#1

Here is a strange 7.62x51 dummy/drill cartridge. The projectile has a knurled crimp rim and the case has no flutes or holes. Tha head stamp was removed on a lathe and the primer is struk. When looking carefully remnants of the NATO-sign are visible. The head stamp was a 3x120


#2

I don’t know whether this cartridge comes from the same source as yours due to the lack of identifying marks but it is certainly very similar. Mine is a ball round and I saw hundreds of these whilst I was in the British army shortly after the Falklands conflict. I was told that as we had expended such a vast quantity of 7.62mm we were now seriously short of the stuff and were having to buy in other county’s surplus and were milling out the headstamps to conceal the sources. A lot of unnecessary trouble I’d have thought and I’m not too convinced by that theory. I’ve also heard that these are Swedish Match loads using Radway Green cases and I think this is a more likely answer. Hope this helps.
Jim.


#3

[quote=“Jim”]I don’t know whether this cartridge comes from the same source as yours due to the lack of identifying marks but it is certainly very similar. Mine is a ball round and I saw hundreds of these whilst I was in the British army shortly after the Falklands conflict. I was told that as we had expended such a vast quantity of 7.62mm we were now seriously short of the stuff and were having to buy in other county’s surplus and were milling out the headstamps to conceal the sources. A lot of unnecessary trouble I’d have thought and I’m not too convinced by that theory. I’ve also heard that these are Swedish Match loads using Radway Green cases and I think this is a more likely answer. Hope this helps.
Jim.
[/quote]

There were large quantities of this 7.62 ammunition available to civilian clubs. They came in white cartons with black lettering: 50 Cartridges 308 Win. 9.45 gram-146 grains Full Jacket V0=857 m/s FFV NORMA - SWEDEN.

If the headstamp is examined carefully through a lens the remains of an RG headstamp was visible, removed by an annular groove. The story amongst shooters at that time was that either the cases, or the loaded rounds, were surplus, failed proof or cancelled stock from an order for NORMA to supply to RG. Either way, they shot well and were a little cheaper than RG stock. I would expect that the weakened rim would be likely to fail in military automatic weapons.

I can dig out dates from my shooting score book and have a carton which I could scan. This doesn’t answer the drill round query though.

gravelbellyEDITED TO CORRECT “RG to NORMA” to read “NORMA to supply to RG” SORRY ABOUT MY ERROR!


#4

Thanks to both of you. I wonder if when the life rounds were weakened too much by removing the headstamp probably it was the reason to turn them into dummys?


#5

These “weakened” rim ball rounds worked perfectly in bolt-action target rifles in the UK over a few years. I believe that the headstamp was skimmed off as they were not being issued by RG as military rounds. The weakened rim may have bent or torn off in the abrupt action of an SLR or machine gun but I was not aware that any of this ammo was used by the military. The civilian shooters fired these in their thousands and they had no reason to make dummies out of them.

gravelbelly


#6

I have seen quite a few of these fired rounds with bullets re-fitted and cases and bullets completely nickel-plated on sale in M13 links as bracelets and belts. These are sold at markets etc as items of clothing (just don’t try going through the airport wearing one). I wondered myself why the headstamp had been milled off. Could EOD’s round be from one of these belts? It looks as if someone has tried to remove the plating, as EOD’s round looks like it has worn / part removed nickel plating.


#7

I have seen more than one of these and there were no traces of any plating. But as you indicated it may still be a civilian item.


#8

I have photographed the NORMA ammo carton for the match rounds with the scooped-out headstamp. My rifle club was shooting these through 1985 and 1986. I am inclined to agree with falcon that the plated “dummy” is not a factory item at all but intended for the militaria trade and made up from fired cases and a bullet then plated.

gravelbelly


#9

Alot of those dummys sold in the belts and bracelets have very poorly die-cast fake bullets with a clear cast mark down the sides, these are sold on militaria type stalls which are aimed more at the curious tourist or passer-by than serious collector. There is a few such places in the famous Portobello Road market in London. These dummies with fake bullets are found in links, stripper clips and on keyrings etc. They also sometimes have various RG headstamps as well.


#10

The one shown above has a real projectile.


#11

I know yours has a real projectile, I was just saying that these cases are used for the souvenir market. I’m sure this could easily be made by anyone with a reloading press and a set of 7.62 x 51 dies.


#12

I agree.