Strange 7.7x58 rounds


#1

I was at a show this past weekend and a man had some old WWII Japanese ammo in a case. He had some orriginal 8mm nambu and 2 stripper clips of 7.7, one was steel cased, with no headstamp and had what appeared to be hollowpoint projectiles. Other was brass, no headstamp but with the normal FMJ projectile. He wanted $30 for each stripper, and $5 for 8 rounds of the 8mm nambu. Anyway, my question is what loading was the steel cased hollowpoint appearance rounds?
I also picked up some boxes of Czech repacked 1945 German 7.92x33 from this guy. Why were the Czechs repacking 7.92x33 in 1949-50? They were also packed on mixed 98 mauser clips of the thin type like the turks used, but not all brass. The box i bought was the later date and didnt have the stripper clips. I was also wondering why this round would have been packed on strippers on the 1946 timeframe by the Czechs.

-Thanks


#2

5 $ for 8 original 8 mm Nambu rounds?

USA : a great country !


#3

I don’t know of any original Japanese military loadings with hollow point bullets. My opinion would be that someone pulled the original bullets and replaced them with the hollow points. I have seen this done to make hunting ammunition for surplus military rifles. $5 for original 8mm Nambu rounds is a little steep in my opinion.


#4

The Czech repacks are from the large quantities of ammo left in Czechoslovakia in 1945, from their own use of it from 1945 till about 1953, and a lot of export sales as well.

The Czechs in 1945 inherited a large number of MP/StG44 assault rifles, as well as a couple of factories making them and parts. They assembled most for thier own use, and also made Magazines as well, mostly with the code “1001” for themselves and East Germany.

The Funeral cortege of the “suicided” Mazaryk ( 1948 or so) had an honour guard of Czech soldiers all carrying MP44s (Clear view in Movie newsreel).

Most of the remaining MP44s were given as Marxist aid to Central African countries in the 1960s and 70s; some showed up in the Somali and Ethiopian wars of the 70s to 90s, in very poor condition…but still functioning, on East German 1960s ammo.