Strange cartridge case with the headstamp".264 LBC-AR"


I wonder Whether this cartridge with the"LBC-AR"headstamp is different from 6.5 Grendel or not. Some articles might prove they have some relationships.

Hello DZF88881-

www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2010/03/26/264-lbc-ar-a-grendel-clone, Steve Johnson wrote : Les Baer Custom has cloned the 6.5mm Grendel and named their creation the .264 LBC-AR. So why would Les Baer, who were well known for producing quality licensed 6.5mm Grendel AR-15 rifles, start competing with Alexander Arms? Let me tell you why. Back in the late 90s Arne Brennan developed a 6.5mm wildcat cartridge based on the 6mm PPC (a cartridge with a well earned reputation as a highly accurate benchrest cartridge). This first generation cartridge spawned a stable of almost identical and, in fact, compatible cartridges. These include the 6.5mm PPCX, 6.5mm BPC and 6.5mm CSS. .264 LBC-AR. Bill Alexander then worked with Arne Brennan to develop a finetuned version of his cartridge for the AR-15 platform. The result was the 6.5mm Grendel. Bill’s company, Alexander Arms, trademarked the name and so no firearm company can use the Grendel name without paying royalties to AA. This is significantly different to the vast majority of cartridges, such as the .223 Rem. or .375 H&H, which do not require royalties. Back in 2006 the majority stake in Alexander Arms was bought by investment Venturecross Capital. Bill Alexander now owns just 31% of Alexander Arms. An industry source tells me that a couple of years ago Les Baer had an altercation with the new owner of AA. Because of this, Les and his legal team researched the trademark claims and concluded that AA only owned the name, not the cartridge design. Les then cloned the 6.5mm Grendel and named it the.264 LBC-AR. The LBC-AR differs slightly from the Grendel in that it has a .295 neck (as used by the 6.5mm CSS) and a 1 degree throat angle (as used by the 6.5mm PPCX).

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It’s more or less the same as the Grendel. It was introduced by Les Baer Custom just before Alexander Arms released its trademark on the Grendel, and was a way of getting around the trademark.

According to AA, the ammunition is not always interchangeable, with steel-cased and some brass-case Grendel ammo being unsuited to the LBC chamber.

PS Renard beat me to it!

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Thanks a lot!