Synchronized R.A.F

I picked up a Winchester and a Remington this week. Who were other manufacturers?
Thanks William

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In the US those are it. For the British, so they also made them.

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The .300 Cal for the Remington is interesting. It would obviously be for a US-made aircraft, and I’m wondering which ones with synchronised guns the RAF might have been using in 1941. By the way, wasn’t the round normally referred to as the .30?

There were still a few British aircraft in service with synchronised .303 Browning guns in 1941, but only minor types, I think (the Gladiator comes to mind, plus some light bombers).

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.30cal for the P-39 Airacobra, P-36 Mohawk, P-40 Tomahawk. All in RAF service in that period.

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For many years our necessity for synchronized ammunition has puzzled me as, for as far as I know the only aircraft we had that had synchronized guns was the Gloster Gladiator. I wonder if it was a purchasing ploy by the British Purchasing Commission, who, remembering the debacle of US supplied SAA in the Great War, wanted to ensure the ammunition was thoroughly QAd.

My recollection may be wrong, but I seem to recall in the very early 70s there were vast quantities of ‘Red Label’ that had been in UK private possession.

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Australia also made Red Label .303 ammunition, commencing around 1928and lasting until 1943 when the general level of quality was deemed sufficiently good that it was not necessary to distinguish between Land and Air supplies.

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A few odd types on the fringes (some relegated to training): Fairey Seal, Swordfish, Albacore; Hawker Nimrod, Audax, Hardy, Hind, Hector; Vickers Vildebeest, Vincent, Wellesley; Westland Wapiti, Wallace.

All of these seem to have retained the Vickers gun; AFAIK, the Gladiator was the only model to use synchronised Browning.

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Tony,

Thank you. I had no idea that all those aircraft were still in service at the beginning of the war and some of them actually saw out the entire conflict. Also, disturbing that we were having to rely on the likes of the Vickers Vildebeast, a biplane, for convoy escort and coastal patrol until 1940.

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One of the more difficult problems I have found with WW2 kit is finding out what happened to it. Did it remain in service in obscure corners of the conflict long after it vanished from the main theatres, was it used for training, and so on?

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Hi Tony
“By the way, wasn’t the round normally referred to as the .30?” I believe the contract for those .300 marked boxes & rounds stated .300 & not .30.
Here is a contract headstamp, & that this is a synchronized example I can’t say.
06%20w%3A%20RA%201941%20300%20Z%20hs
edited to add the dummies box.

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0.30 inch In British Service. Tony Edwards

U.S. Ammunition Supplied to Great Britain 1939-1941, Tony Edwards, IAA Journal Issue 485, May/June 2012 pp. 16-24
Untitled

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Some day I’ll learn to look before I speak. Here’s a Western box.

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Tony,
it seems that terminology was changed towards the end of the war.
“.300-inch” is for example used in “Instructional Notes on the .300-inch Browning Machine Gun (Model 1917)”, published Sept. 1940. It is also used in the “Small Arms Manual” (no year) authored by J.A. Barlow [the EM2-Barlow?] and R.E.W. Johnson for the Model 1917, Springfield and Garand rifles. I also recall seeing “.450” being used for the Thompson SMG, but cannot find it at the moment.

“.30 in ammunition (American)” is used in “Pamphlet Not. 11 Small Arms Ammunition” published on February 24th, 1945.

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Tony: Some older RAF planes were used in east Africa in 1940-41, where the opposition was Italian and often at least as old as the British planes. It was the Vickers Wellesley’s finest hour; perhaps its only hour! Jack