Taser XREP 12 gauge cartridge


#1

I recently completed my recertification as a Taser instructor for my agency. The class was great as usual, and their staff are some of the most knowledgeable and talented instructors I’ve met.

This go-round we were certified on several new products. Most notably of interest to the folks here is the Taser XREP (eXtended Range Electronic Projectile). Grossly sumamrized, it is a plastic-cased 12 gauge cartridge that contains a miniaturized and modified Taser for deployment at ranges of 15 to 100 feet. The cartridge/projectile is designed to assist in the safe capture of violent persons with a minimum of force. it is classified as a non-flexible, less-lethal cartridge. Nominal velocity is approx. 300fps. Propellant is an unknown charge weight of black powder.

The cartridge is offered in several versions, including live rounds and training rounds, and also versions that are specially ‘keyed’ via the cartridge head/rim for safe use in the Taser X12 shotgun (produced by Mossberg).

I was allowed to take several pictures of the gun and various cartridges. I will return later to post links to them and a lot of additional info; I’m on dialup-only and getting them uploaded to my Photobucket album has been hellish. As always, any error or omissions are my own. Please do not link to, forward, post or publish the attached photos.

Additional documentation and information can be found at taser.com


#2


Older (large yellow fins) and newer XREP projectiles. Pictured are the back/secondary halves. After striking the target, the projectile separates into 2 sections. The front/primary section has barbs to secure it in the target or in clothing. A wire connects the lower half, which has small needle-like projections to hang in clothing or skin. This provides a larger affected area, helping to more quickly incapacitate the person targeted. The XREP delivers a single, 20-second NMI, at a reduced amount vs. the X26 handheld Taser. Upper right is an older (large yellow fins) XREP training projectile placed back in a spent shell.


5-round box for the XREP.


Case stamp for XREP cartridge. Reads ‘TASER’; raised/relief. Also pictured is an older (large yellow fins) XREP training projectile.


Front/primary section of the XREP projectile. Barbs are similar in size and function to those employed by handheld Tasers. Rear-facing contacts take advantage of reflex to grab at the projectile when it is deployed.


#3


XREP training cartridge. Projectile is plastic, weighted to simulate trajectory of working XREP projectile. Black plastic stabilizing fins can be seen folded against the projectile; they deploy to provide rotational stability in a manner similar to some other 12 gauge and artillery/RPG projectiles.


Closeup of the breechface (Taser/Mossberg X12 shotgun). Raised ‘rim’ is keyed to the XREP cartridge, and prevents any standard 12 gauge round from being fired through the weapon. The X12 has a custom-rifled barrel; versions of the XREP are available that can be fired through a standard shotgun. All X12s are fitted with bright yellow furniture and warnings/logos to further prevent them from being used as a standard shotgun.


Older XREP projectile (much smaller fins on current versions).


#4

Mwinter,

That’s some cool technology there. Lets you make someone do the “Jitterbug” at 100 ft. range. Looks like a 12 Ga. Sputnik!

No doubt Pepper has a drawer all ready for these?

Thanks for sharing.
Dave


#5

Just had a look on the Taser site. It’s almost worth getting tased to get a round. Or better still getting someone else tased. Here’s a pdf file on the XREP.


#6

Here in the Great State of Texas we call being tasered “Riding the lightning”. Nothing I would EVER recommend!


#7

I volunteered to be shot with one, mainly to see the effect. They’re about $175 each, and have to be purchased in packs of 5. They declined, mainly due to the fact that it can requires minor tools to remove the contact barbs from a person (unlike the standard Taser probes). The ‘Taser claymore’ (area denial Taser bank) is also impressive (but limited).

They have a test setup where a portion of the XREP device is hooked to the clothing and the other portion held in hand…video tests I’ve seen are amusing. The ‘ride’ is somewhat less spectacular than the handheld Taser X26, but still seems effective. I’m here in TX as well; in my AO it has been referred as the “Christos Electrico”.

I’m working on an XREP article for the IAA journal, pending approval from Taser admins.


#8

id take one in the chest as long as I could take it home with me after im done pi**ing on myself


#9

Not me folks! They’re cool alright and I would not pass up a free offer… unless I had to be shot with it! Had enough volts thru this old hull and I sure ain’t VOLUNTEERING for any more!

Would like to borrow that rig though. I gotta stray cat in the yard and it’d be worth $175 to see him glow in the dark! (Desire no long term damage to feline culprit)


#10

deleted


#11

Just reviving this thread a bit and seeking better images and documentation.

Is there any better images around of the practice loads for these?
As the fin design has changed from gen. 1 to gen. 2 the practice projectiles are also different as we see.
Is there any propper documentation or test reports available?
And it seems Taser itself is not marketing these under their own name anymore?

Here the 1st gen. type (live proj.):
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Here the 2nd gen. type (live round):

Images are form the web.


#12

Does anybody know the Vo and effective range for these?