The way to handle a gun


#1

Watching quite often US TV series (the mean interest being to discover new things (false or true) like in the Miami experts, Las Vegas Experts, NCIS, aso) I am wondering about the new way, since a few years, to handle a gun.

The finger being along the slide rather than on the trigger.

Safer for the team mates of course, but a little bite unsafe for the owner when he is entering into a house full of bad guys.

Is this the new way used by the goverment agencies or is it like that because it is politically correct ?

JP


#2

Jean-Pierre,

While I enjoy watching CSI I certainly do not look to it for shooting/tactical tips - most of it is Hollywood nonsense. That being said, it is pretty standard these days to train with the finger alongside the frame for safety sake. While there may be bad guys inside a building, there are often innocents present who may be in danger of a reflex trigger pull. There is more emphasis these days (rightly so) on safety and target/threat determination. When you look at pictures from Iraq and Afghanistan you can identify the US trained local fighters as they have been trained to be “finger safe”. I remember on a trip to Dominican Republic, the resort employed guards at all entrances and after 5:00pm they were armed with Mossberg 500 shotguns. These poor guys who I’m sure make a few dollars a day, happily patrolled carrying the guns by the grip with their fingers on the trigger and the safety off. I took a picture of one and he happily posed the same way. As a safety instructor, I talked to that guard about putting the safety on and keeping his finger off the trigger. He didn’t seem too concerned about it until I told him he was most likely to blow his OWN foot off, then he safetied it. Probable took it off after I walked away - who knows.

Take care,
Paul


#3

Hi Paul,

Thanks for the info.
There is a big difference between guarding Punta Cana hotel ressorts (where you are right, they don’t need to be ready to shoot at once) and entering and searching an house, the finger along the slide even if you know you have innocent people inside.

Target determination is one thing very important I agree.

But to put yourself in an inferior situation is another thing:
loosing fractions of seconds,
the non natural movement of the finger which must go down and then back, the fact you have to press directly the trigger till the hammer’s release,
the possibility under stress you press the slide and not the hammer,
aso

Funny.

thanks for the explanation.

jp

loose the first
and has nothing to see with


#4

JP
Remember that we have a lot of departments that are equipped with Glock Pistols, IE no external safety (the internal safety switch is mounted in the trigger).
As they say on one of the police forums, “Keep your booger hook off of the bang switch, until you want the weapon to fire”


#5

JP

I have been a shooter for more than 60 years and can tell you, without a doubt, that the hardest weapons to master are the semi-auto pistol, the double-action pistol, and the revolver, in that order. When shooting any handgun (or rifle or shotgun) rule #1 is, has been, and always will be - keep your finger off the trigger until you’re ready to fire!

Familiarization and practice will eliminate the disadvantages that you mentioned. No one should be carrying a handgun without those two basics.

The LAST place I would look for any guidance in gun handling would be television and movies.

Ray


#6

[quote=“Tailgunner”]JP
Remember that we have a lot of departments that are equipped with Glock Pistols, IE no external safety (the internal safety switch is mounted in the trigger).
As they say on one of the police forums, “Keep your booger hook off of the bang switch, until you want the weapon to fire”[/quote]

Hi
Do you mean if you have an external safety on your pistol, you enter and search the rooms with your safety on ???
!!!
jp


#7

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]JP

When shooting any handgun (or rifle or shotgun) rule #1 is, has been, and always will be - keep your finger off the trigger until you’re ready to fire!

Familiarization and practice will eliminate the disadvantages that you mentioned.

Ray[/quote]

Ray,
I am not talking when you are at the shooting range.
I am talking when you enter an house, knowing you have some bad guy inside.
It is totally different.
JP


#8

JP

No, I’m not talking shooting range either. I mean ALL situations. There is a world-class shooting academy in Arizona called GUNSIGHT. They train military, law enforcement, and civilians in all phases of gun handling. That rule #1 comes right out of their book.

The Glock pistol has more than one safety built into it and they are disengaged one after another when the trigger is pulled and then automatically re-activated when the trigger is released. This guarantees that the pistol is completely safe with a round in the chamber - and that is they way they should be carried.

More conventional semi-auto pistols like the M1911 are carried loaded, cocked and locked (Condition 1). When encountering a situation such as you described, the safety is disengaged but the trigger finger is kept outside the trigger guard (Condition 0). A well trained individual can disengage the safety and fire in one easy motion.

Ray


#9

I’ve taken several defensive pistol courses which included firing on moving targets, having to quickly decide if a target is a “good guy” or “bad guy”, etc., and they’ve all taught me to keep my finger along the slide. With a little training it becomes an unconscious act to move your finger to the trigger when you’re ready to fire.

There would almost certainly be a small time difference if your sights were already on the target. However, if you had to react to an unknown threat (i.e. bad guy hiding somewhere in a house), I suspect that the time it takes to recognize the threat and get your sights on target would be greater than the time it takes to move your finger to the trigger.

If I can get my hands on a shot timer I could go to the range and test it out.


#10

When I got my AZ CCW I qualified with a 2" S&W revolver. Those little guns are hard to hold when reloading so over the years I had developed the habit of holding them with one finger through the trigger guard, two through the frame opening, and then using my thumb to rotate the cylinder. Well, much to my dismay, when I was reloading during qualifying, the instructor screamed at me, “GET YOUR FINGER AWAY FROM THAT TRIGGER!!” The other students all got a chuckle at my expense because they figured I would be the last one to be yelled at.

But, it goes to show that some instructors believe you never touch the trigger except to fire. A good rule. I’m working on my technique but it’s hard to break 50 year old habits.

Ray


#11

Thanks for your explanations.

JP