Tip Colors ID


#1

My thread on tracers and other tip colors has just about dropped off of page one but since this question is along a different tack I thought I’d start a new one.

This is a serious question.

As I get older I have an increasingly hard time with some tip colors. For example - the aforementioned tracers. The 7.62x51 NATO M62 tracer has an orange tip while the M62 OHF tracer tip is red. When I was seperating mine the other day I found myself having to go outside in better light and even using a jeweler’s loupe in some cases. It got me to wondering how you guys who are older than me (we know who you are) manage? And what about the collectors who are color-blind?

I find myself shooting less each year because of failing eyesight and I may have to take up cartridge collecting full time. :) :)

Any thoughts? Or am I beyond help?

Ray


#2

Ray, for those concerned a special lamp with a color temperature of 5000 Kelvin may be recommendable. It is actually day light - just artificial.
I use such lamps for my photo equipment when I photograph cartridges and other ammo.
A good substitute tool for looking at colors is a small but strong LED flashlight. It is quite inexpensive (paid about 8$) and gives a lot of hard light. I use it on hardly visible primer annulli or where other color is almost gone or very dark and hard to identify.
And don’t be worried my eyesight is not too bad and I really need tools like these.


#3

I’m only 38 and I still have to seek brighter lighting on occasion! My biggest problem area is with darker colors, i.e. deciding if a primer seal is black or dark purple.


#4

two_az, this is where the LED flashlight works perfectly fine.


#5

Ray and two_az, Since you two youngsters are having a hard time identifying tip colora I would suggest the problem is the impure air in Arizona :-)
I am pretty close to moss removal from my eyeballs and Santa Claus brought me a neat little device last year. Only name on it is CE. It is about 2 1/4 X 3 1/2" by 3/16" thick. Has a pull out 1 1/2 X 1 1/2" about 3 power glass with a 5 power 1/2" round “booster” area in one corner and two bright white LED lamps at the top. Works wonders for color. Can also be used as a flashlight as the lamps are exposed when it is closed. Keep it in my cartridge show kit all the time. Stay good before Christmas and maybe Santa will be good to you.

Gourd


#6
  • It is NOT quite uncommon [especially among men] to find persons who don’t have a normal color vision. Please enter here at —> toledo-bend.com/colorblind/ishihara.html and test yourself. If you wish, post the result here. => I have a normal color vision with 20/20 eye sight. Liviu 10/28/08

#7

Gourd

The problem may very well be the air. The difficulty in AZ is that we can’t see ours so it’s hard to tell if it’s impure. You guys in CA have an advantage over us because you can actually see and feel and taste yours. ;) ;)

From the responses it appears that LED may be the answer. I’ll have to look at Wally World to see what they have.

Liviu, I’m almost afraid to take any kind of eye test. Sometimes it’s best NOT to know. But, I’ll look at the site. Thanks

Ray


#8
  • @ Ray Meketa: Back in Romania without a normal (perfect) color vision you could NOT get a driver license or work in some jobs. When I got the US driver license [Class E] in New York City nobody did care if I have a normal color vision or not. Liviu 10/28/08

#9

I heard LASIK does wonders if you are brave enough. I’ll go into a tiger habitat but will “Take The F” and pass on the laser surgery. I have a friend who did it and he rants and raves.

I have also seen nice articulating floor stand magnifier lens that have a 8 inch circular florescent bulb that surrounds the magnifying glass.

If you have a florescent fixture, you may also want to invest in a specialize “REPTILE LIGHT” that exactly mimics the sun in both UVA & UVB wavelengths. The light that EOD recommended may serve this same function for less money?

Jason


#10

Thanks EOD - I’ll have to pick one up the next time I’m out.

Gourd - I saw someone at St. Louis last year with a device like you describe. It looked perfect for picking out headstamp variations.

Liviu - fortunately I passed the color blindness test, although I am moderately near-sighted.

The AZ air may be too clear, but at least we can go outside any time day or night and look at cartridges in the blinding sunlight :)


#11

I took that quicky eye test and passed with flying colors (pun intended). As my eye doctor told me at my last checkup, “You’re eyes are fine but you have a bad case of O-L-D.”

I was going to ask about using a blue light bulb instead of a white. Back when cameras used film, indoor photos were shot using a special blue bulb that somehow enhanced the colors. I’m not sure how it worked but was wondering if possibly this would be an answer? I’m not talking about a standard blue bulb but a special one made just for photography.

Anybody know about this? Maybe this is what EOD was talking about?

Or should I simply get a gizmo like Gourd suggested with LED light? Or an LED flashlight?

Ray


#12

Liviu,
I made the test…perfect color vision


#13

Ray, it is no blue light anymore nowadays. It is just pure white as real daylight is (unlike normal lamps).
But as said get a good LED flashlight and you will see the real colors even if they are almost too dark to identify.


#14

As I PM’d Liviu passed the color test OK. This is the same test they gave in the service. My problem is cataracts that are not ready to come off yet. In dim light have a problem with dark blue, black and some other colors.

Ray, will search and see if I can find the little gem I use. Could be that Wally World carries it. Trouble with the air in AZ mountains is it is always green from the reflection of the trees :-) As a side during WW-2 the military used colorblind people to spot camouflage as most of it stood out from natural terrain like a red flag.

Gourd


#15

Gourd, that is one of the coolest facts of the many I have learned on this forum about the color blind WW2 soldiers finding camouflage.

Jason


#16

[quote=“Ray Meketa”]I took that quicky eye test and passed with flying colors (pun intended). As my eye doctor told me at my last checkup, “You’re eyes are fine but you have a bad case of O-L-D.”

I was going to ask about using a blue light bulb instead of a white. Back when cameras used film, indoor photos were shot using a special blue bulb that somehow enhanced the colors. I’m not sure how it worked but was wondering if possibly this would be an answer? I’m not talking about a standard blue bulb but a special one made just for photography.

Anybody know about this? Maybe this is what EOD was talking about?

Or should I simply get a gizmo like Gourd suggested with LED light? Or an LED flashlight?

Ray[/quote]

Ray the reason for the blue bulbs was that outdoor film was built / balanced to record true color at 5200 degrees Kelvin. (a light color degree measurement standardised as the overhead sun on a cloudless day) The colour of an light bulb in a lamp was often about 2800 to 3200 Kelvin which was/ is quite yellow, so the blue bulb brought the light back to 5200 & the film recorded the correct color.
There was an indoor film made but it was not in common useage for most photographers, unless they did a lot of work photographing interiors with lamps normally in the scene, such as Better Homes & Gardens & etc. Although some photographers did substitue a flash bulb for the conventional light bulb to get correct color light but it was hard to do because when the light was tuned on the flash went off! Also good way to have fun? with your friends!
Thats the deal with flim response, nothing to do with seeing / judging color.

I should also add the same color shift is true with digital cameras
With out changing your set at daylight white light balance (if your digital has such a control) take a photo outside then walk inside and with the living room lamps on and with the flash off take another photo, and you will see a yellow cast to everything, put your flash on (it is balanced to daylight 5200 K.) & the room colors will appear true but look closely at the areas around the lamps and you will still see the yellow cast.
clear as mud? Well I should hope!