Tornadoes and ammo


#1

Just curious, how do people living in tornado prone areas secure and protect ammo and boxes from both direct impact and high humidity which can’t be ameliorated because usually there is no electricity too? Here is my old post about the same viewtopic.php?f=8&t=10896&p=78019&hilit=tornado#p78019 but maybe someone has new info/ideas?


#2

In terms of cartridge collectors - they probably don’t. Unless a cartridge collector wanted to have their whole collection in a gun vault with guns, then there is now way to really protect it. Collectors usually want their collection in display drawers, or lots of boxes showing the headstamps or something. To keep everything locked away in ammo cans in a vault would almost foil the point of the collection, which is to display, enjoy, and study it. Same problem with flooding or any natural disaster. If one were in a probably hurricane or tornado area, then keeping the collection in the basement would be wise, but if they are in a river valley known for flooding, then keeping it on the second floor would be better.


#3

A house built of bricks would solve the problem too.


#4

Vlad

I’ve never been in a tornado or hurricane, but I did survive the Great Arizona Wildfire of 2002 and I’m here to tell you that the last thing I was concerned about during the two week ordeal was my “stuff”’, including my cartridge collection. You quickly learn what is important, and what is not.

JMHO

Ray


#5

A HOUSE BUILT WITH BRICKS WILL STILL FILL UP WITH WATER AND PERHAPS EVEN BE WASHED AWAY - I’VE LIVED IN BOTH TORNADOE AND HURRICANE, USA AND HAVE SEEN MANY BRICK BUILDINGS COMPLETELY DESTROYED BY BOTH. JUST THOUGHT I MIGHT SAVE SOMEONE SOME MONEY BUILDING THAT FLOOD, TORNADOE, HURRICAN PROOF HOUSE - SUCH DOES NOT EXIST AT THIS TIME.


#6


#7

I love that door !!!


#8

ftknox.com/vaults/vault-room-doors/
Bunch of companies make them. For the most part fairly affordable.


#9

I guess shipping to Germany will be more expensive than the door itself.


#10

EOD
Ask some of the gents from the Netherlands about being close to a twister, they were standing outside the door at SLICS when the one hit the St. Louis airport (myself I got comfortable in the tornado shelter, after offering my advise that they should join me there)


#11

I know of a collection room that has a poured foundation basement with a Spancrete ceiling.

A vault door to basement…no windows.

Essentially a “semi” fireproof vault.

Everyone will find fault in a system; but that is pretty close to cool (other than one egress option in an emergency)

I guess you could have a “vault” door to the exterior as a second egress option as well ?


#12

Pepper,
This is what I am showing with the door. Tornado proof ( no hurricanes in Nebraska). Behind the door is 26’ x 26’ x 8" of reinforced concrete all around.
Bruce


#13

Keep mine in the basement-same place Kathleen and I go when a tornado warning sounds.

Hurricans are something else! Six to twelve feet fo salt water and mud causes a LOT of problems. No good solutions. A sealed room is likely to float!

Cheers,
Lew


#14

Up to 20 inches (50cm) of rain per day are in forecast for some areas in the South, let’s see how Lew’s floating sealed room idea works.


#15

On May 30, 1998, a F4 tornado destroyed the little town of Spencer, SD (6 people killed) which is 40 miles west of Sioux Falls, SD.
I had the chance opportunity to meet the Deputy Sheriff for McCook County South Dakota in 2004. Spencer is in McCook County. After telling the Deputy that I am a cartridge collector, he told me about the cartridges found in this little town that was destroyed by a F4 tornado.
The State of SD volunteered their low risk inmates to help clean up the town afterwards. The Deputy stated that I should have been around because many 5 gallon pails of ammo including old stuff was pick up off the ground in the clean up of a town of only 154 people and 60 houses. The ammo is now resting safely in a landfill.
As Ray pointed out, if a natural disaster comes our way, the possessions become unimportant in a hurry.
Bob Ruebel