Two rifle cartridges that I need help with identification/


#1

The cartridge on the left I suspect to be an early 32-40 but not sure and I almost didn’t feel the slight shoulder. The one on the right as you can see has a very tight crimp so I included that as well. help!


#2

Beney
Some things to consider when trying to identify a cartridge. Books that gave a dimension often copy from another book and so it could be a mistake or it could be correct, but that still doesn’t take into account that different makers had different tooling and that chambers were not standardized for quite some time and so variations creep into the same case type. So if your looking for a specific number & it’s not that number, it could well be what you thought it was to begin with, just by a different manufacturer than was used for writing the book.

Reloads. Your one on the right has a Winchester primer. These primers were sold for reloading, so that has very likely been reloaded. Yes they were used by the factory but it’s not headstamped. (Yes there are exceptions to almost every case) The other (left) seems to have a mark on the primer that looks like a seating mark which is often not seen on factory ammunition. So my guess on that one is the same, a reload. Reloaded cases sometime show swelling at the base if not full length resized & even then sometimes you can see case scratches left from the die. Look under , on the rim for extraction marks that might or might not be there.

Did you get these from the same source as the .40-65 you asked about? That one like the 32-40 with the shoulder could be a guy with a heavy hand on the reloading dies? The crimp on the other could be the same reason. No reason (I know of) to crimp that so hard.

A lot of the early US sporting rounds were often reloaded and cases were sold as new empties and new primed empties.

A good quality magnifying glass of 10 X is a great tool to have. You can often see die & crimp marks, and judge if they should or should not be. Also it helps isolate your vision.

Hope this is of use and help. The more you look, the more you will see & soon you will gain more confidence in what you are seeing, when something odd like these show up. I hope I haven’t offended you, telling you things you all ready knew, It was certainly not my intention. It’s a learning process many of us go through, & still are going through. (every day)

Obtain & read as many ammunition books as you can.

Good Collecting & keep your powder dry
Pete


#3

[quote=“PetedeCoux”]Beney I will take any all information on cartridges and there certainly is nothing in your message to take issue with and besides, I’m pretty thick skinned. OK, we’ll stop there and I DO appreciate the input. I was hoping they were not reloads especially the one to the right and I think most every thing else I will be posting will be factory and if not then I need to know. Thank you, Tim
Some things to consider when trying to identify a cartridge. Books that gave a dimension often copy from another book and so it could be a mistake or it could be correct, but that still doesn’t take into account that different makers had different tooling and that chambers were not standardized for quite some time and so variations creep into the same case type. So if your looking for a specific number & it’s not that number, it could well be what you thought it was to begin with, just by a different manufacturer than was used for writing the book.

Reloads. Your one on the right has a Winchester primer. These primers were sold for reloading, so that has very likely been reloaded. Yes they were used by the factory but it’s not headstamped. (Yes there are exceptions to almost every case) The other (left) seems to have a mark on the primer that looks like a seating mark which is often not seen on factory ammunition. So my guess on that one is the same, a reload. Reloaded cases sometime show swelling at the base if not full length resized & even then sometimes you can see case scratches left from the die. Look under , on the rim for extraction marks that might or might not be there.

Did you get these from the same source as the .40-65 you asked about? That one like the 32-40 with the shoulder could be a guy with a heavy hand on the reloading dies? The crimp on the other could be the same reason. No reason (I know of) to crimp that so hard.

A lot of the early US sporting rounds were often reloaded and cases were sold as new empties and new primed empties.

A good quality magnifying glass of 10 X is a great tool to have. You can often see die & crimp marks, and judge if they should or should not be. Also it helps isolate your vision.

Hope this is of use and help. The more you look, the more you will see & soon you will gain more confidence in what you are seeing, when something odd like these show up. I hope I haven’t offended you, telling you things you all ready knew, It was certainly not my intention. It’s a learning process many of us go through, & still are going through. (every day)

Obtain & read as many ammunition books as you can.

Good Collecting & keep your powder dry
Pete[/quote]