U 44 .303 cut bullet


#1

Hi all, was cutting the bullet like this a common practice during war time? Or was this done buy some guy sitting in a farm wanting to make a `better bullet´? This i a live U 44 VII.

Thanks,
Jonathan``


#2

Jonathan, if you intended to post a photograph of the bullet I’m afraid nothing is showing.


#3

Sorry, will try again…


#4

I can’t see to upload photos. will try again later.


#5


#6

You will see these often, as people wanted to use them for hunting and a FMJ isn’t ideal for that. Nothing special there I’m afraid.


#7

Thanks Mayhem. Didnt think it was something, i know how much time these guys have on their hands…


#8

Has anybody actually shot any deer with these types of “modified” bullets? Seems to me your not saving any money. There are a lot of hi quality hunting cartridges for sale in sporting goods stores.


#9

I tend too agree, the amount of time that went into cutting and filling that bullet cant really save you any money. But if your farmers are like ours, they use what they have and make a plan:):):)


#10

This is also not recommended as FMJ bullet jackets typically have an open base. Cutting away the tip can cause the lead core to be blown out on firing, leaving the jacket in the bore.

Firing another round behind the obstruction can cause barrel damage.


#11

You cant discuss hunting ethics with a man who has to put his kids to bed hungry!
If FMJ is dime a dozen and hunting bullets cost a pretty penny, then ingenuity comes to life in the glow of the kerosene lamp at night. He has all the time in the world.

Powerty was a thing 50+ years ago.


#12

Don’t know why anyone would bother to mutilated a .303 Mark VII bullet, anyway. They’re designed to be unstable in flesh and even though they don’t expand, they make a horrific exit wound and do a lot of internal damage. They were (and possibly still are) widely used for hunting in Africa, partly because they were easy to get and partly because they do work very well on man-sized animals. I would think this sort of mutilation would adversely affect accuracy while doing little to enhance effectiveness.


#13

https://jmvh.org/article/missile-injuries-over-a-century-of-service-the-303-projectile-and-its-wounding-capabilities-a-historical-profile-1/


#14

Very interesting read. Thank you Mayhem.


#15

Thank you for the very interesting link.