U.M.C. item id needed


#1

Looks like today is raise your hand for help day.
Can anyone help with this UMC item?
What is it and was the marking added later?
Rim diameter same as a 12 ga shot shell.
The marking reading clockwise is UMC 66 458 1/2


#2

Hi Pastammo,

Is the numbers number series on the case head(?) “458.5” not “458 1/2”? Or is it 4585 or something else?

Are the numbers and letters(?) raised or impressed? Since the photo is out of focus it is hard to tell.

Was this item found in the ground? If so was it In the United States or another country? Can the item be cleaned without degrading/ further damaging it?

Is there evidence of a primer hole or holes inside the “casing”?

Is the item all brass?

Brian


#3

Brian - this pic should read better.
Answers are:
I am reading (with magnifier) as 458 1/2 but top of 8 and 1 are hardly visible on rim and could be different.
The numbers appear handwritten.
I am calling shot shell but it was the only one in a mixed batch of ammo with several cartridges from the mid to late 1800s.
The primer appears to be intact inside casing.
Item is all cardboard except for primer.
Rim diameter .861, there is a groove above neck diameter .710
Neck diameter .545
Case length 2.21
Appreciate your help


#4

I doubt it is a shot shell in that it is necked. Even if the mouth was crimped only a small short string of shot could exit before blowing the case apart, it being paper.
There are perhaps 5 -6 all-paper shells known by various makers in different countries but they all are shaped like a traditional shot shell.

Being all paper & having just a Boxer primer & no battery cup or holder to support it I can only wonder if it would function when struck.

That rim is very thick, & I’m not aware of a shot shell with that sort of thick rim, all the other all-paper shells I’m aware of have a standard rim thickness.

All this said, I do not know what it is or even why the attribution to UMC which went out of business over 100 years ago. Nor do I think they had felt tip pens back then.

Don’t throw it away, we all have stuff waiting to be identified & if we live long enough, maybe we’ll get lucky


#5

Thanks Pete. Will keep on my desk as mystery item so far.


#6

Is it only my sick fantasy or do I see here a wooden carved cartridge like item with a primer like thingy inside and a hand drawn headstamp?

Maybe a large scale classroom item someone made to instruct people at gun ranges or so?