Unidentified 7.62 Russian headstamps


#1

I would appreciate positive identifications of the makers of several of the pictured cartridges. All of these have 7.62 at the 6 o’clock position in the headstamp and most, if not all, were made in the UK.

#1 is headstamped K24, and is attributed to Kynoch, Witton, Birmingham, UK

#2 is headstamped G-17 and is attributed to Greenwood & Batley, Leeds, UK.

#3 is headstamped G.18.F.4 Is this one also a product of Greenwood & Batley?

#4 is headstamped C.17.F.1 Who made this, and is it also a product of the UK?

#5 is headstamped Kynoch-17 in Russian.

Note the matching punch crimps on 2, 3 and 4. Also, the primers of 1, 2 and 4 are flat, whereas those of 3 and 4 are rounded. Are there other headstamps that fit into this ‘family’?


#2

Here are the identifications according to Peter Labbett’s book on .303.

K24 Kynoch, Witton
G 17 Greenwood and Bately Ltd., Leeds, Yorkshire (Albion Works)
G.18.F.4 Government Factory Number 4, Edmonton, North London, administered by Eley Brothers
C.17-F.1 Government Factory Number 1, Blackheath, Staffordshire, administered by Birmingham Metal and Munitions Company.

NOTE THAT LABBETT INDICATES THAT ON THE “G” HEADSTAMPS FOR “GOVERNMENT FACTORY” THAT THE “g” MAY SHOW ON THE HEADSTAMP AS A “C.” “C” IS NOT A DIFFERENT FACTORY.

I am not sure, but I assume that the one Marked “Kynoch” in Cyrillic was made at Witton as well. I don’t know why the Russians would put “Kynoch” on a cartridge made by them.

Hope this is of some help. It illustrates why we all must think outside of the box as to caliber of a cartridge we are looking at, when trying to find a headstamp ID. It also shows that a collector’s library should not be limited to books only on the calibers he collects. All of this information is from a book on .303 British, not 7.62mm Russian.


#3

John,
Once again, I’m impressed. As you point out, I never once considered looking in my Labbett. A lesson learned, I hope. Thanks.


#4

Nice set of British Contract 7.62x54R Rounds Guy!

The Cyrillic Kynoch (looks like “KANHOKb”) Is also a product of the Factory at Witton, Birmingham, UK. You have the later style with the date and calibre. There was an earlier one with Kynoch in Cyrillic and “1-17” which was only used in 1917.

I have never heard of the “K-24” one. Can anyone say who that would have been made for? Britain stopped shipping ammuntion to Russia after the October 1917 Revolution.


#5

[quote=“Falcon”]
I have never heard of the “K-24” one. Can anyone say who that would have been made for? Britain stopped shipping ammuntion to Russia after the October 1917 Revolution.[/quote]

May be it was made for Finnland


#6

The 1924 Kynoch round was made for Finland. Kynoch continued to manufacture ball and tracer cartridges for Finland right up until WW2.

As Falcon says, the cyrillic headstamped round is Kynoch made for Russia.

Guy - I had an article in the ECRA Journal recently about British WWI production for Russia that detailed all the headstamps. There are quite a number of them, but if you do not have access to the article I can e-mail it to you.

The pin stab bullet securement is very typically British and can be found on other foreign calibres made in the UK at that time, such as the 6.5 x 50SR and 6.5 Roumanian Mannlicher.

My e-mail is

aoe(dot)303(at)tesco(dot)net

Regards
TonyE


#7

Tony,
I’d love to see the ECRA article. Any possibility of getting it into the IAA Journal?


#8

I don’t see why not. I will send it to Chris.

Also, I am working on an article on the history of the Government Cartridge Factories for the IAA journal which I hope to finish in the next couple of months.

Regards
TonyE