Unknown 20mm (most likely 20x102) AP-T or APDS-T projectile


#1

Hello,

I got this semi-cutaway of a 20x102 AP-T (or even possibly an APDS-T) this weekend.

The projectile was odd to all my friends at the Dutch NVBMB/ECRA fair, and what puzzled us, was the fact that it had no ‘crimping groove’ in the bottom part.

I’m quite sure it’s a 20x102 by its dimensions (all in mm on the picture), but is it genuine / experimental or just a mock-up ?

Can anyone tell me the name or origin of this projectile ?
Also if anyone has a picture of a ‘complete’ projectile or round, please post it here or email it to me.

Thanks,
Orpheus72


#2

Unless it is a very odd test vehicle I think this is a made up item made of a core of a German 20x139 DM41 HVAP-T and a base sabot of a 20x102 APDS variant (or something else).
The driving band would normally not have an exposed front section whithout a short guidance piece in bore diameter.
Also the section below the driving band looks like glued on or the like.

If this items is real I would like to hear details about.


#3

[quote=“EOD”]Unless it is a very odd test vehicle I think this is a made up item made of a core of a German 20x139 DM41 HVAP-T and a base sabot of a 20x102 APDS variant (or something else).
The driving band would normally not have an exposed front section whithout a short guidance piece in bore diameter.
Also the section below the driving band looks like glued on or the like.[/quote]
You have the same idea as all of us at the ECRA fair, but only the ‘core’ looks to be glued to the ‘petal’ …
The visible glue on the section below the driveband is where the projectile was glued into the case, it seems to be a solid attachment where some traces of glue are missing.
Also, the petal/driveband section is copper-aluminum, and doesn’t look like any of the base sabot’s of the Mk149 or Mk244 or other APDS series…

I sure second that. i’d love to know if it’s real, and am eager to have some details/info.


#4

When you roll the projectile on a flat surface is it describing a smooth kurve or is any of the parts running out of true?
If so this would be a safe inficator for a private handicraft.


#5

[quote=“EOD”]When you roll the projectile on a flat surface is it describing a smooth kurve or is any of the parts running out of true?
If so this would be a safe inficator for a private handicraft.[/quote]
I did follow your reasoning, and put in a small lathe (one for wood, but that doesn’t matter ;-p). The point of the core doesn’t deviate at all when spun.
Also looked closer at the parts with a 15x magnifying glass, and couldn’t see obvious toolmarks. the ‘sabot pusher’ piece even looks to be pressed instead turned.
If it’s a home made item, it is damn near perfect (wish i could be that precise)


#6

[quote=“orpheus72”][quote=“EOD”]When you roll the projectile on a flat surface is it describing a smooth kurve or is any of the parts running out of true?
If so this would be a safe inficator for a private handicraft.[/quote]
the ‘sabot pusher’ piece even looks to be pressed instead turned.
If it’s a home made item, it is damn near perfect (wish i could be that precise)[/quote]

Yes, a lathe is also good for ckecking, just most people do not have one.
Can it be aluminum stock bar? This could have the described surface.
I wonder how the front support is mounted and how it is separating if that is meant to be.

Can you tell us about the magnetic properties of the different parts of this item?


#7

My initial picture of the forward support wasn’t that clear, so i made a new close up (projectile sits upside down in the case).
Here you can clearly see that the forward support is made from 2 different materials.
Those are (I guess) press fitted on the core (it doesn’t move by hand, and I don’t want to force it), and could separate through pressure/rotation…

As for the magnetic properties, I used a small neodymium magnet to test them.
The tracer cavity, drivebelt and (aluminum?) pusher are not attracted by the magnet
The core is mediate attracted by the magnet
The rear piece and forward sabot pieces are highly attracted by the magnet