Unknown .303 drill round


#1

I have in my collection a Drill MK IX with 3 extra grooves in the bullet. See image;

Is this genuine? If so, done by what country? What is the purpose? better recognition in the dark?

all info/suggestions are welcome…

thanks,

Joost


#2

BTT


#3

Who ever used it, it was some official Army Body, as the primer Pocket edge shows the typical cut marks left by the Ejector of a Bren Gun ( several different cuts around the circumference of the Pocket Hole… The round was probably a Locally Acquisition, made up from unheadstamped cases, which had been Once fired ( due to the case forming process for Cordite cases, these Drill rounds must have used Fired cases; Unprimed cases in the making process are unformed, as they are tapered and shouldered After the primer is inserted and the cordite seated and wadded. Also, specifically made Drill rounds have Blind primer Pockets.

The lack of markings is not of consequence, as a lot of .303 Ammo got through the system without headstamps, both in Ball and Blank.

regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#4

I can’t tell from the picture, is that a lead bullet? If so provenance as “official” is low. I would have said the scratching around the primer pocket is evidence of a berdan decapping tool, probably home made. You have to spear the primer and manually lever it out.
Do the holes in the casing go right through? I can see red colour, is that paint?. Red denotes drill or DP to give it its proper term in British military convention but drill rounds usually are nickle plated and fluted. Also, DP rounds do not have the berdan pin in the centre of the primer pocket


#5

I just checked my catalog, and when I collected .303, I had several unheadstamped dummies that aside from the bullet, would exactly match the description of the round pictured - no headstamp, empty Berdan primer pocket with anvil, 4 holes in case, red-wood spacer inside case. I had them with a couple of types of jacketed bullets, and also with a plain wood bullet. I noted one that I got from New Zealand, rather than England, but it was so identical to the British ones that it could have come originally from England.

While I cannot speak for the originality of the projectile in this round, although I wondered if this could be a Dutch refurbished dummy - I believe that the case and spacer as shown are correct from an original dummy round.


#6

If the bullet is lead then it is definitely a home made job.

If CN or CNCS then it started out as a Drill Mark IX, a WW2 expedient. It is not true to say Vince that drill rounds do not have an anvil. Nearly all of them do. It is only those made in the luxury of peacetime that have a plain primer pocket, mainly Drill Mark VIs, and Inspectors rounds.

The D mark IX had the red wood spacer that extended through to act as the core of the bullet. The cannelures on the bullet look fairly crude but could be a pukka modification by the Dutch or someone else. I agree with Doc though, those are Bren extractor marks round the primer pocket.

Regards
TonyE


#7

Tony - I seem to recall having a Dutch box in my collection when I had it that was marked “voor Bren” or something like that. I kept my catalog but being bqasically stupid, I didn’t scan all my boxes before I broke up the collection. I should have for my files. Did the Dutch use Bren Guns? Of course, I don’t know that the round is Dutch. It was just a thought, based more on the comments about Bren gun marks than anything.Lots of countries used .303 but I am not sure all of them used it in Bren guns.


#8

[quote=“TonyE”]If the bullet is lead then it is definitely a home made job.

If CN or CNCS then it started out as a Drill Mark IX, a WW2 expedient. It is not true to say Vince that drill rounds do not have an anvil. Nearly all of them do. It is only those made in the luxury of peacetime that have a plain primer pocket, mainly Drill Mark VIs, and Inspectors rounds.

The D mark IX had the red wood spacer that extended through to act as the core of the bullet. The cannelures on the bullet look fairly crude but could be a pukka modification by the Dutch or someone else. I agree with Doc though, those are Bren extractor marks round the primer pocket.

Regards
TonyE[/quote]

If the bullet jacket is CN or CNCS, and this round started life as a Mark IX drill round then the wood core should be visible in the grooves. It is a strange modification which I would expect to suffer from the jacket coming loose from the core. There are also fainter marks

gravelbelly


#9

The envelope of this cartridge is cupro nickel, and without the three grooves it would have been a drill mk IX.

I am not sure it’s a dutch cartridge, because the dutch produced a drill round made from old cases, with a soldered envelope on the case.

It is also marked with 2 grooves on the case (see image)

so it’s probable a modified drill mk IX…

Joost

Ps. the dutch armed forces did use the Brengun for a longer period after WW2. It was replaced by the belgium made MAG (7.62x51mm)