Unknown 7.62 x 51 Link


#1

I have a belt of 66 7.62 cases all in these odd links. (see photo)

They nearly all say “AA52 SAV” on them, but one or two say"AA52 PRI" or “AA52 ROS”. They look like a disintegrating version of the MG42 link, with each link held to the next by clips instead of springs. What are these called wnd where are they made? P.S. Sorry about the rubbish photo.


#2

Can’t recall the exact model number, but I think there was a French light MG (perhaps AAT52?). It was made in both 7.5 and 7.62. Links might be for that.


#3

[quote=“Falcon”]I have a belt of 66 7.62 cases all in these odd links. (see photo)

They nearly all say “AA52 SAV” on them, but one or two say"AA52 PRI" or “AA52 ROS”. They look like a disintegrating version of the MG42 link, with each link held to the next by clips instead of springs. What are these called wnd where are they made? P.S. Sorry about the rubbish photo.[/quote]

Falcon,

These links are for the French designed 7.5 x 54mm & 7.62 X 51mm Arme Automatique Transformable Modele 52 (AA52). This link is interchangeable for both calibres but it has been reported that those found with 7.5mm rounds stand higher when set on a table, measuring to the back of the “hump”, I myself have yet to note this difference. The links were made in various belt pitches including 14.7, 15.75 and 17mm. The colour of some links (e.g. green) may indicate a variant of pitch.

France ran a dual-track military weapon supply system. They used 7.62x51mm weapons and ammunition when operating as NATO troops but reverted to their 7.5mm calibre at other times. Like some other countries, France was a reluctant adopter of the 7.62 NATO round as it gave negligible improvement over their native cartridge and was therefore a change for the sake of change.

Your links were all made in France, those stamped PRI were made by Philippe Rossi Industries. Unless the fired cases are French than you can be sure that the belt was assembled using range pick up cases. However, the AA52 links are less common and therefore more interesting in the UK than M13 type GPMG links.

gravelbelly


#4

This belt was a novelty item I got from a large army surplus store in Debyshire. I think I paid


#5

It is French for the MAS 7,5x54 MG
I have differend markings in my collection
see pict

regards Harrie


#6

It may be worth to note that this link design is originally German (designated “Gurt 17/81”) and was copied by France after the war.


#7

Some pict out of JANE’S pocket book 19


#8

@ EOD - I have a piece of this Gurt 17 belt, taken from the wrechage of a crashed mE 110 - This used steel pins instead of clips to hold the links together. I take it the AA 52 links are disintegrating, as they are not fastened together as with the Gurt 17 Links.

@ Gyrojet - Thanks for the info on the AA 52 GPMG…


#9

Have also a special link what is the first link to load the wapen


#10

[quote=“Falcon”]@ EOD - I have a piece of this Gurt 17 belt, taken from the wrechage of a crashed mE 110 - This used steel pins instead of clips to hold the links together. I take it the AA 52 links are disintegrating, as they are not fastened together as with the Gurt 17 Links.

@ Gyrojet - Thanks for the info on the AA 52 GPMG…[/quote]

Falcon what you have is the “Gurt 17” (with pins) for the MG 17.
The “Gurt 17/81” was for the MG 81 and MG 81Z and depending on the version it could be made into disintegrating and non disintegrating with a special pair of pliers.
So the French copied the “Gurt 17/81” (can post the German original tomorrow) not the “Gurt 17” you have.


#11

MG 17/MG 81 links with the steel pins how hold the links together

And for caliber 7,9x57 a view German links( like the AA 52 links French)


#12

With pins, “Gurt 17” : MG 17
Without pins, “Gurt 17/81” : MG 81 / MG 81 Z, here also versions exist without split “hooks” (like the French copy).