Unknown red .50 BMG Blank


#1

Hi,

I have this fired blank with no headstemp:


Maybe from Norway?


#2

Yes, Bakellittenfabrik ( Now part of NAAMO) of Norway, patentees and developers of the Plastic cased, metal head blank for military Training use.

I remember seeing some being tested by Australian Cavalry (Tank) units here in Australia in 1967-68, and handled quite a few empties (and a couple of live ones as well). Since the functional use of them required a clumsy recoil shieild and connecting rods back to the Trunnions, it was not adopted; “Blank fire” was done in APCs at least, with the .30 cal Brownings, which were easy to Blank fire;
a trial was also done of Red Plastic B/F blanks in .30 cal, and again, issues of cases melting and deforming in Hot guns cause Non-adoption. They stuck with the M1909 US Wadded-lacquered Blanks
up to the 90s, then contracted AMA star-crimped brass blanks, then Igman Konjic star-crimped brass blanks from 2000 onwards.

The Newer (FN built) .50BMG use FN and ADI crimped Brass .50 Blanks, with a “new” Blank Barrel (floating chamber action).

Doc AV


#3

Wasn’t Lars Ringdal the inventor and patentee?


#4

DocAV,

Proper spelling is “Bakelittfabrikken”.
Bakelitt = bakelite
fabrikken = fabrikk is factory, the “-en” ending is a definite article.
= “The bakelite factory”

I don’t know what role Ringdal played in the development of this. He did create the replaceable blank caps for 9x19 and 7,62x33 calibres, a long, thin red plastic capsule with four internal “split marks”. These were seated in regular cases, lightly crimped/staked into place, and could then be replaced after use for as long as the brass would last. Which I can imagine is a long time firing only blanks.

This specific 12,7x99 blank has the designation NM26.
NM = norsk modell = Norwegian model

  • Ole

#5

Ole, I meant this patent:
docs.google.com/viewer?url=pate … 918868.pdf


#6

Ah, I hadn’t seen or heard of this patent before. Thank you for sharing it.
Worth mentioning that the Norwegian blue plastic short range practice cartridges with and without tracer (NM17) feature the same inner case as the NM26.

  • Ole

#7

Anybody wonder why, if this is a fired round, the nose isn’t opened up?


#8

Mel, I guess it is just a dud primer.

Ole, what makes me wonder is that Ringdal in the beginning seemed to have tried to advertize and market the cartridges himself.
But it obviously took a large company like Bakelittfabrikken (who actually could produce these cartridges) to get it going.
It would be very interesting to known more details about Ringdal and the way all has happened.


#9

If you look carefully, there are splits with sooting back in the 4 grooves. These Blanks are notorious for “low charge” and also very small splits on opening( seeming as unfired Points.
The development of the “inner tube” to contain the charge was as a result of the plastic melting and deforming on firing with heavier Blank Powder loads ( 7,62 cases usually don’t have the tube, whilst .30 cal Do.).
The resultant problems with use led to a lot of Countries to either Not adopt them (USA), or like Australia, to go fully over to Brass cased Long Blank, with substantial charges, for both Gas and Recoil Operated MGs.

Doc AV
BTW, as to the Spelling of Bake… I do know Bakelite in English, but the Nordic Languages are literally a Foreign country for me, despite my wide range of Language knowledge…Leonardo Da Vinci was the Last Man who truly “Knew Everything” in his time.


#10

[quote=“EOD”]Mel, I guess it is just a dud primer.

Ole, what makes me wonder is that Ringdal in the beginning seemed to have tried to advertize and market the cartridges himself.
But it obviously took a large company like Bakelittfabrikken (who actually could produce these cartridges) to get it going.
It would be very interesting to known more details about Ringdal and the way all has happened.[/quote]

EOD,

Bakelittfabrikken was founded in 1946. I assume that Ringdal was the founder, as that is what I’ve heard and read several other places. See for example this article about injection molded boat hulls made at Bakelittfabrikken;
batmagasinet.no/artikkel/rotasjonsstøpt-bestselger-ferier-50

Ringdals first patent was the brass-case-with-replaceable-red-insert in 7,62x33 as I described above. In 1953, it seems. Of course he worked with the designs before that. 7,62x33 and possibly 7,62x63 too (.30-06).
In 1954 he applied for a patent of a short range cartridge where the case and projectile are made separately.
In 1955 one describing the “inner casing” of e.g. 7,62x63 (visible clearly on the blue plastic practice rounds in this cal) was made.

Plamil:
“Plamil was a small company that existed for a couple years, about 10 years ago [making it mid-70s, my note], that experimented with short range and blank rounds in plastic. They experimented with amounts of colours and even colour combinations in 5 calibres, this being; 7,62x51mm, 7,62x39mm, 7,62x63mm, 12,7x99mm, and 40mm Bofors. All in all it was as far as I know made 46 different cartridges, and that is too great an amount for me to describe them all here.
The idea behind Plamil cartridges was making a safer round without any tear/debris. Plamil was of course first with the “duckbill” rounds, where pressure make the cartridge tip split to the sides and not forwards.
The basic idea behind the short range rounds was that case and projectile were to be made of separate pieces of different types of plastic, and then be loaded as a regular round would.
This frontier of experimentation has not lead anywhere to any production.”

This is from an article written by Vidar Andresen, from Nordisk Våpenforum, issue 4 - 1985.

These days, Bakelittfabrikken continues to make both cartridges and other products. For example, the popular “Pioner” boats designed by Helge Duus are made by “rotating injection molding” at Bakelittfabrikken still.

EOD, if you are interested, I can scan the article (four pages) and send to you. It is in Norwegian Bokmål.

DocAV,

I didn’t mean to be belittling or rude. I only meant to inform you of the correct spelling. If you feel my way of putting it was impolite, I apologize.

For the cartridge not seeming fired, I do disagree, I have multiple fired examples and they do not look like that. They have clear splits, at least the tip, but in the photo in this thread you can clearly see the intact mould marks.

  • Ole

#11

:-)

The logo here is the same as found on older boxes of blank/short range ammo.

  • Ole

#12

tennsats,
NO offence taken…I am always willing to be pulled up on any Translation or writing mistakes with both English and Foreign Languages.

Doc AV
"Lingua graeca non habet!"
“He has no Greek!” ( old Roman Insult between Senators.)


#13

I think, that there was not enough powder in it.
There are just 2 little holes with burn marks.

Here you can see pictures:

@ all
Thank you for the informations.