Unknown round - possibly used in construction?


#1

This is part of a lot I’m working on catalouging for an auction. I was wondering what it is.

o/a length: 51.43mm (2.0245in)
Case Length: 34.73mm (1.3675in)
Case Diameter: 9.58mm (0.3770in)
Headstamp: Nil
Marking on primer: ICI



#2

This is a cartridge for a British anti personnel mine. If i remember correct it is called No8 Mk1 “Pistol Ground Spike” (cal .40).
I will check my documents and see if I can find details.
(someone else may be faster)


#3

I look forward with interest what you can find out about this round


#4

It also has “Switch” somewhere in the title. In the US one in that condition would be worth $50-$65, perhaps a bit more in a good auction.


#5

One designation I have foudn for it was “AP Switch” (AP = anti personnel).


#6

In “Yust” it’s called:
BRITISH PISTOL GROUND SPIKE
SWITCH A.P. NO.8
.40 CALIBER BOOBY TRAP CARTRIDGE.
Developed during WWII, the cartridge has a turned steel bullet and was made by Imperial Chemical Industries.

Hope that’s enough.


#7

Thank you for the correct designation.
By it’s nature I would not consider this device to be a booby trap but an anti personnel mine.
The russians by the way had in WWII a similar mine designated “PMP” using a 7.62x25 tokarev cartridge in a barrel (assume it was not rifled). Strange that they used a standard cartridge to stay cheap and then made a whole barrel for that thing rising the production cost by 1000%.
Here it is:
maic.jmu.edu/ordata/srdetaildesc.asp?ordid=1130


#8

That link shows only Soviet use in Afghanistan. Did they use another version during WWII?


#9

This seems to be where these guys found it the first time.


#10

Here is na scan of the page from “The Cartridge Collectors Notebook” by Charles H.Yust which shows the complete device with instructions on how to use it. Click on the image to enlarge if to read the fine print.


#11

Thanks very much for all the replies, it’s certainly answered my questions.

I guess I better change the title of the topic from “Construction” to “Destruction” LOL


#12

The round was actually made by turning down a partly formed .351 Winchester case. On some examples the remains of the original headstamp can still be seen.

There is also a drill round made with a turned wood bullet.

Regards
TonyE


#13

If anyone has an inert and or drill one of these for sale I’d be very interested.
Simon