Unloading .45ACP full moon clips

I found a bag of loaded full moon clips (in my room) and decided to unload them. Boy, it ain’t easy!!! I finally devised a twist-around-push-out method. I see full moon unloading tools online, they are tubes into which one inserts the whole round “projectile in” first. But surely WWI soldiers did not carry that, did they? What was done to unload WWI full moon clips in the trenches? Also, are there any clips with markings?

Vlad,

I don’t think unloading the clips, even if completely and only with empty cases, while in the trenches. The Revolvers played no major role in combat, compared to rifles, machineguns and other real infantry weapons, being carried mostly for emergency use by officers or persons that were deemed not to be encumbered with a rifle. Also, the ammunition was issue in clips. I believe the clips were considered, in combat, totally expendable, as were rifle chargers.

I have always puzzled over the lack of markings on the clips also. I have never seen a marked one, although careful examination of shapes has netted by .45 Auto collection a few minor variations. Nothing that affects function at all.

By the way, when the clips were issued in bulk, rather than already loaded in sealed cartridge boxes, they came on a long “stick” machined so that in cross-section it looked almost like a three-leaf clover. The slips just slipped over one end. I seem to recall a full one had little brad heads showing at the ends, to keep them from just dropping off. As I recall, it was not necessary to remove these to actually pull a clip off. I lot of those sticks went thru my hands at the gun shop. I have always regretted not keeping one. It really fits into a .45 ACP box collection! Each stick, perhaps about a foot long, held a lot (!) of the half-moon clips.

John Moss

John M.

1 Like

Thanks for all moon clip info. You wouldn’t happen to have a picture of that 3 leaf clover stick?

Vlad now you understand my comment easier to load & unlosd when discussing the half moon clips vs full moon clps.

1 Like

“Demooner”:

1 Like

Vlad - no, I don’t. Someone likely has a picture of one, or one in his collection. Years ago, when various agencies were getting rid of these obsolescent clips, they were quite common. I could kick myself for not saving one for myself. I even used to own both an S&W and a Colt Model 1917 Revolver, which is what the clips were made for. If I found one today, I would hang on to it. It was about the width of the inside edge of the clips, contoured to fit them, and perhaps 10" long. Looking at a ruler, I don’t think they were quite as long as I mentioned before (12 inches), but I could be off a little. Have not seen one for twenty or more years. They were a single piece of wood - I don’t know what wood type, but they were usually a fairly dark reddish-brown color, although that might have been staining. The were quite smooth - a simple but well manufactured thing.

John Moss

1 Like

Pete, you are right, I just unloaded several half moon clips, they are SOOO easier to unload. And I paid attention to the shape of them, as John Moss said, and found a couple of slight shape modifications.

Vlad,
there is another system of “demooning” which is supplied by Brownells.
l_352197000_1_l
I use this device now since some 20 years for my competition S&W 625.
The only drawback is that demooning of half moon clips does not work.
Regs
Jo

1 Like