US shotguns with unusual ctges


#1

I would like to know which specific shot ctges (except the usual gauges) are used in smooth barrel US shotguns (and the name of the shotguns).

I have found :
44 Extra Long shot used in Marble Gun Getter
38-40 WCF shot used in Stevens New model Pocket shotgun N°39
44-40 WCF shot used in Stevens New model Pocket shotgun N°39
38-35 Everlasting shot used in Stevens Hunters Pet shotgun
38-45 Everlasting shot used in Stevens Hunters Pet shotgun
44-50 Everlasting shot used in Stevens Hunters Pet shotgun
44-65 Everlasting shot used in Stevens Hunters Pet shotgun

Do you know others ?

Thanks
JP


#2

.50 EX for the Standard Arms Camp .50 pump smoothbore.


#3

thank you very much !
Any info about the ctge ?
jp


#4

Winchester made a .20 caliber shot and shotgun for inside trap shooting Wingo was its name.
link to pictures Winchester Wingo Update , Pictures


#5

Hello Vic,
Thanks.

What I am looking in fact are the ctges designed to be used in riffled barrels (example 44-40 WCF) which, when loaded with shot, are used in smooth barrel shotguns (and the name of the shotgun)

I will try to correct the post and if I can’t I will make another one.
JP


#6

Howdy JP
Winchester made shot loads in a number of case types. .50-110 .45-90 to name two. So did UMC with the wood sabots. If they were meant to be only used in smooth bore firearms I don’t know, I do imagine special order guns could be had but as there are a bunch of these shot-loadings found today. I can’t imaging WRACo or UMCCo making any kind of quantity & not having a market for other than custom guns.
Sorry not be of more help.

Glad to see you getting back to your book.


#7

For many years shot cartridges were made in .32 Rimfire as well. Stevens made a variant of the “Favorite” that was smoothbored to use these.


#8

JP,

Came across this while looking through my catalogues for something else and remembered your post, don’t know if it is of any use?

Mike.


#9

I don’t know anything about these shot loads specifically, but I would
think, from a interest and some knowledge in older Winchesters and
revolvers from the late 19th Century, that calibers like .32-20, .38-40 and
.44-40 were made to be shot also in rifled–barrels, and that calibers like
.32 S&W and .38 S&W were likely shot only (or at the least, primarily)
in rifled barrels.

I would think that part of the reason for the wood sabots was so that they
could be shot with some success from a rifled barrel. Otherwise, I would
think they just could have elongated the brass cases, since all those guns
were designed to extract and eject a live round (longer), not just a fired case.

Just I thought. I could be all wet. Wouldn’t be the first time and unfortunately,
probably won’t be the last either.

John M.