Vegas TV Show Goof


#1

Has anyone else caught this goof? In the opening segment of the show a .357 Magnum cylinder loaded with cartridges is shown. The show is set in the Fall of 1961, but the cartridges in the cylinder are headstamped “WINCHESTER 357 MAG”. This headstamp started in 1982. The cartridges should have been either SUPER-X or SUPER SPEED for 1961.


#2

They probably wanted the recognizable branding of “winchester” visible for effect, as opposed to “super-x” which is not as well known. The shows & movies figure that if 99.9% of people don’t notice, then they might as well do it. My favorite is the .45 auto headstamped as “.45mm” in the movie “The Marine”, and mentioned in an earlier thread: http://iaaforum.org/forum3/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=11903


#3

Talking about TV, I watched “Sons of Guns” episode in which they restored and shot a 20mm Solothurn anti-tank cannon. When they test it with live ammo, they get hangfire, twice. I am not an expert, the TV guys are, but wouldn’t you fire a blank first in an old large-calibre just restored cannon?


#4

Gosh Ron, there are probably only a hand full of people in the world that would have known that bit of information and probably only 1% of them would have spent time watching TV, when they could have been working on their collection!!
Now, I have to admit, becoming a SERIOUS cartridge collector has certainly changed the way I see things, cartridge and firearms related especially. I caught myself scrutinizing Sherlock Holmes’ loading of his revolver the other night and was pleased to see they didn’t use .38 Specials! (I couldn’t find my marker pen or I would have been indexing my SLICS haul.)


#5

That is another goof - I mean the one on the “Sons of Guns” show. They did not have two hangfires. They had two misfires. A hangfire is when the cartridge goes off some time after the firing pin has already crushed the priming compound - usually a second or less, although I had a two second hangfire once. That is why you never open the action of a gun the just misfired as if you are trying to set a speed record. Since neither of the two cartridges fired, but were taken out of the gun whole, they were “dud” misfires.

However, that said, if you listened carefully, I am almost sure that one of the shooters DID have a hangfire or well less than a second. I am almost sure I heard a “click-bang” from one of the rounds.

I just saw a program on a Knob Creek gun dealer. I’ll admit I don’t care for this thing on every “gun” program now, where they have to blow up something.
It is pretty immature as far as I am concerned - not amusing at all. The Knob Creek show also made the guy’s son look like an idiot, in my view.

These explosions they stage are dangerous. I know they are “experts,” but on the same “Sons of Guns” show with the 20 mm, as I recall, they blew up a truck with a P.I.A.T. and what appeared to be the hood of the vehicle landed behind the low berm they were crouched behind, meaning it could easily have fallen on one of them. Luckily, it fell to the side of where they were crouching, and not right on top of them.

Well, two bits worth from a cranky old man who does not think these shows portray shooters and “gun people” in the best light. I guess I should be thankful that anyone is willing, these days, to put on television anything portraying guns in anything even faintly resembling a good light.


#6

The other strange thing on the “Sons of Guns” episode about the Solothurn, was all the fuss over something being wrong with the firing pin that allededly caused the first misfire (but not the second). They never said what the firing pin problem was, and made a fuss over getting a replacement pin, and paying $500 for it. Not that I know the first thing about Solothurn firing pins, but it appeared to be a very simple design which could have been easily fabricated or repaired in the Red Jacket shop, if in fact there was something wrong with it. And also that another firing pin “magically appeared” in the same town (Baton Rouge). I think the whole misfire-firing pin schtick was purely for drama, as is true for much of the show. Thank God for VCRs - I usually record shows and zip through all of the drama sequences and commercials.


#7

Thats exactly what I said when I seen it. I do not know why I watch the show, as it is usually completely asinine. I suppose it is somewhat entertaining.