Weatherby 460 Magnum


#1

What happened to this poor primer?


#2

Firing pin hole erosion - “gunk” build up around the firing pin?


#3

It looks to me like the firing pin is hitting all along the circumference of the primer, but why and how?


#4

I am just guessing here but -

I would first look at the firing pin hole in the bolt face. I would bet you will find a “build up” of carbon or other foreign matter around the hole. Most often you will encounter erosion (a hole) instead of build up (a bump). A hole will make a bump on the cartridge head as the high pressure (and a .460 Weatherby is definitely a high pressure cartridge) will cause the brass to be pushed into the hole causing a “bump”. The opposite will happen if there is a build up of carbon or rust or displaced metal. This bump will cause the brass to be pushed past the build up and against the bolt face - causing a depression in the cartridge head. This is most often observed in .22 LR cartridges (soft head and smooth bolt face due to rimfire system).

Mind you this is just a guess on my part, but I also note some rim deformity at the 6:00 position on the head. If my guess is correct, this bolt is in serious need of some maintenance.


#5

Sorry. I have no gun for this round, but your suggestions sound good. My understanding is that this is a high end hunting calibre and the guns are expensive, so one would assume a very good gun maintenance.


#6

I do own a Weatherby .460 Magnum Mark V Custom Deluxe.

Yes, it is a high end hunting rifle - although I don’t hunt.

The guns are expensive, but the rounds are ridiculously expensive - especially if you just use it to shoot rocks from time-to-time.

I have seen many expensive weapons that aren’t maintained adequately.


#7

FWIW, I think a this is someone’s shop bench doodle with a fired cartridge case, messing around with a small (jeweler’s) pin punch and a hammer. “Bubba” decided he didn’t want that primer to come out so he smashed the edges with a pin punch and then patted himself on the back for beating the primer into submission.

Brian


#8

I wonder if they might have been trying to remove the primer? Maybe if they were unfamiliar with the shape of a primer, perhaps they thought they could get a small punch under the primer to pry it out? Given how beat up it is, I think we can safely assume that their skill and knowledge of tools and cartridges was somewhat limited…

-Larry


#9

Modern version of “Trench Art”!

I agree with BD, and, if you look very closely at the indents, the partial circles in the primer match up with partial circles in the casing, and are much too even/round to be from residue on the bolt face.