We're fighting for our rights in Italy right now


#1

Just to let you know…because this could be a serious trouble even for ammo collectors…

If the new law will be approved a special license will be needed to own even INERT ammo and components and for reloading.
This means that reloading and ammo collecting could soon disappear because that license will be very hard to obtain.
Our organizations and pro-gun parties and politicians with all italian shooters and collectors are fighting for their rights.

I hope that we’ll have some good news soon!


#2

That really blows big time, Pivi!

I really hope you guys beat that over there. Even in the US it seems we are loosing more and more rights and not just gun and ammo rights. Let us know if there are any petitions going around that a US signature would still be helpful on. Your reality will be reaching all corners of the globe soon I am sure. If I can help, let me know.

J


#3

Marco

Good luck to you guys. I hope that smarter heads will prevail.

Is there any sort of “grandfather” rights? That is, if you have a collection now, can you keep it? If the new law passes, will they pay you for what you have?

Keep us posted.

Ray


#4

Thanks for you support

The only thing we can do is wait… we wrote to all the politicians involved into this project…our organisation “FISAT” ( the italian NRA) is fighting for our rights.
We have a lot of pro gun men and women in our government…we hope that the new law won’t be approved by the european commission


#5

Cross my fingers for you guy’s in Italy

In Germany, a local city, they want to introduce tax on guns.
They think about $130, 00 per gun each year.

I love Arizona.

Dutch


#6

Don’t put your trust in the european commission, they are even more anti-gun than the UN. What is the Caiman thinking of? Is he really losing it, like the foreign press says? Seems like it, when stupid thing like this comes from his "government"
Soren


#7

The European Union is definitely not to be trusted. They will approve any anti-gun law they can.


#8

… and our beloved national politicians happily accept all the bulls… that comes out of Brussels unreflected, it is so convenient!


#9

I’m sure the only way we can be free of it is the Euro currency collapsing and taking the EU with it. It will be messy but we will all be better off in the end.


#10

Europe needs more gun/ammo friendly politicians like this guy (running for the office of agriculture secretary in the state of Alabama):

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#11

Falcon, I don’t believe this really helps. If it came to that our national rights-cutters will continue, just a bit less coordinated at the beginning. The disease is not Brussels, the disease is the irrational trend in our societies combined with politician’s worm’s-eye view.


#12

Hi falcon,
this is the second time you are complaining about Euro.
I don’t understand the connection.

Don’t you still have the pound anymore in England ??
If yes why do you complain about the Euro currency ?

Another fact now. most of the pressure on guns in the Bruxelles committee is made by England.
They want the other countries apply the laws you have in your country from a long time ago.
Therefore I don’t understand.

Or perhaps the british media are acting in such a way anybody in your country believe all this shit is coming from continental countries when in fact it is coming from your own country !

jp


#13

We do still have the pound in England. I think the only way that the EU will collapse is if the Euro currency does. It isn’t just guns that the EU causes problems on, most Europe is now effectively run from Brussels. This is why I hope the EU collapses.


#14

OK guys this is the actual situation:

a license will be needed for reloading but nothing SEEMS to had been changed about inert ammo components…

The law has already to be approved by the italian parliament, they can refuse it or change some points…we’ll see


#15
  • It is very clear why so many people left Europe for good during the last centuries. I don’t trust EU and their leaders of today, it seems that they have the brain in the wrong head. Liviu 07/29/10

#16

Hey friends- We are wandering way off into political stuff here.

Discussing the actual legislation is okay, but some of the above are pretty far off topic.
Not that i disagree with the sentiments, but this is not the place for them. Keep it on the ammo, please.


#17

[quote=“Pivi”]OK guys this is the actual situation:

a license will be needed for reloading but nothing SEEMS to had been changed about inert ammo components…

The law has already to be approved by the italian parliament, they can refuse it or change some points…we’ll see[/quote]

That sounds better than it first appeared, but it will still have an effect.

If you need a licence for reloading that will cut the amount of people reloading by (say) half. That will reduce the amount of components that the dealers sell to reloaders so they start to reduce their stock. Then it becomes harder to get what you want so more people give up reloading because they can’t get the supplies they want, or the prices have gone up and its not economical anymore.
So the dealer sells less and less and then the wholesalers reduce their lines and the importers stop importing. Its a downward spiral.

All firearms control starts as a law but its in the commercial implications that the real damage gets done.


#18

Vince,

you point out the problem

A lot of small gunshops that earn with reloading stuff, cases and bullets will be out of businness.
Ammo and components will become hard to find and more expensive…


#19

It would be much easier for bureaucrats to decide that “reloading licenses” would apply to ALL ammunition components, including inert collector cartridges since they are merely primers cases and bullets.

Do not assume that collectors will end up being exempt.

Similarly, EU regulations on firearms have some strange provisions and interpretations. At first they wanted their restrictions to apply to “all guns” including wheel locks and flintlocks in museums being welded to be inoperable, and licenses for any sales between collectors. I think they backed off some on that sort of stuff., but, like in the U.S. none of these 'crime control" laws actually have any impact on criminals.

Therefore it is best to fight all restrictions, not only for the specific category of ammunition or gun we individually like, but the entire universe of guns and ammunition. As an example, here in the U.S. there are moves to outlaw all guns over .50 caliber, mainly intending to target the “evil sniper rifles” in .50 BMG caliber. However, the actual language of the laws often apply to Sharps, Spencer, Winchester and other early cartridge firearms, as well as African dangerous game guns. Worse, if idiots decide that .50 caliber guns are too dangerous, then how long will it be before they are back with the same attacks on .45 caliber guns, then .38, .30 and .22, and finally .17 calibers?

Every gun or ammunition collector must be alert, and ACTIVE in legislative matters. Membership in suitable advocacy groups; money to friendly politicians; volunteers in campaigns; letters to editor; show up for demonstrations or legislative hearings; these are all tools you can use.

Good luck to our friends in Italy with this one, but the battle is not limite to Italy.


#20

[quote=“Pivi”]Vince,

you point out the problem

A lot of small gunshops that earn with reloading stuff, cases and bullets will be out of businness.
Ammo and components will become hard to find and more expensive…[/quote]

We have found the same problem in the UK with ammunition because all ammo sales now have to be face to face. You cannot now order ammunition over the internet but have to take a drive to your nearest dealer. When you get there you find his stock is depleted because although he still stocks .223, .243, 308 etc he won’t keep the oddball calibres because the demand is too low and doesn’t justify the expense.
People are having to drive hundreds of miles just to buy ammo. How long will that last before they just give up?