What did I buy?-6.5x55mm Danish


#1

I bought what I thought was 6.5 Mannlicher-Schonaur ammunition in a box of 100. When I compare the cartridge to a DWM casing, the two are not the same.
6.5 Mannlicher
base-.451
Rim- .432
Case length- 53.76 MM

Unknown cartridges
base- .474
Rim- .460
Case length- 54.88mm

The shoulder of the loaded ammo is several mm farther forward than the 6.5 Mannlicher case.
The bullet measures .260,dead bolts on. 6.5 Mannlicher is susposed to be .268-9

Please help ID’ing this ammo.
Thank you.


#2

These are reloads of once fired ammo, maybe that’s the difference.


#3

6.5x55 Swedish?


#4

Danish ( Haerens Arsenalet) 6,5x55 Swede M94 ammo; Made in 1946, Cases reworked because of Anvil problems ( Triangle mark) : Bad for rifles because of High levels of Nickel Fouling from Bullet Jacket.

Not advised to be used for shooting…only collectible!!!

The Danes made this ammo for the few thousand M96 Swedish Mausers Loaned to them Post-war by Sweden ( Guns returned about 1950 or so)

Very common in US Milsurp about 30 years ago ( until the problems became evident!!!).

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.


#5

I got one of these rounds, and it had written on the case that the triangle meant that the ammunition had been repacked for home guard use. Obviously that was wrong.


#6

Doc, I have 3 questiuons:

  1. These cartridges had an anvil problem. Did Danes disassemble already loaded ammo, fix the problem and put them together again or they got all separate components and proceeded with the fix? I assume they got projectiles from Sweden, does this mean Swedish-made ammo has a problem?
  2. I have a what is called here Danish Garand, a used WWII gun given to Danmark after WWII and re-worked to be fully functional. Danmark is a small country. How many guns did they need? Why did they ask for bolt action Swedes? A semi-auto Garand would look more appealing, especially after what must have looked like a a big win against mighty Germany? Garand was touted as one of the reasons, remember the poster “The M-1 does my talking”?
  3. I understand how Danmark, being small next to Germany and having previous wars over their border, felt uncomfortable, but why did they think Germany would rise again, being bombed out and totally occupied? Surely, if Germany could rebel and defeat occupying Allies, a few thousand Swedish rifles would not matter? Police? But there was no petty crime!! Remember the joke that if you lose your wallet in Danmark, there would be a policeman posted next to it. Why? To protect it until you come back.

#7

Thank you for the reply. What threw me was the way too small bullet, even for 6.5 Swede. .2595 can’t be a tack driver by any means in a .265 bore. I’ll take the ammo back for a refund.


#8

The cartridge is a Danish produced the revised anvil is special for the Danish cased
production was around. 5,000,000 until 1950 after which year was sufficient identification

http://www.vaabenhistoriskselskab.dk/arma-dania/_AD_patroner_view.php?editid1=144


#9

[quote=“sksvlad”]Doc, I have 3 questiuons:

  1. These cartridges had an anvil problem. Did Danes disassemble already loaded ammo, fix the problem and put them together again or they got all separate components and proceeded with the fix? I assume they got projectiles from Sweden, does this mean Swedish-made ammo has a problem?
  2. I have a what is called here Danish Garand, a used WWII gun given to Danmark after WWII and re-worked to be fully functional. Danmark is a small country. How many guns did they need? Why did they ask for bolt action Swedes? A semi-auto Garand would look more appealing, especially after what must have looked like a a big win against mighty Germany? Garand was touted as one of the reasons, remember the poster “The M-1 does my talking”?

[color=#BF0000]After 29th august 1943 the German occupiers confiscated all the M/89 rifles they could find. The story goes that they were given to, among others, concentration camps guards. After the Danish Brigade came home with their swedish equipment we borrowed some more rifles. The shooting community had to do the same, so a lot of M/96 and M/38 rifles ended up here. The force helping out in Germany, had british equipment, since they worked in the british occupation zone. In 1949 we joined NATO and got Garands as part of the MAP programme. The home guard took over the swedish Mausers until they got their M/53(17) = US Model of 1917 around 1954-55.
When the Garand was replaced by G3 (M/75) they were returned to the US, some with a new barrel, marked with (crown)VAR = Vaabenarsenalet.
[/color]
3. I understand how Danmark, being small next to Germany and having previous wars over their border, felt uncomfortable, but why did they think Germany would rise again, being bombed out and totally occupied? Surely, if Germany could rebel and defeat occupying Allies, a few thousand Swedish rifles would not matter? Police? But there was no petty crime!! Remember the joke that if you lose your wallet in Danmark, there would be a policeman posted next to it. Why? To protect it until you come back.[/quote]

[color=#BF0000]In 1946 we had realised that the main threat to western Europe lay to the east and that threat had a fully functional military force, unlike the smoldering heap of rubble to the south.
Soren
[/color]


#10

Thanks to all for the history lesson on the ammo. An interesting read.


#11

I got a couple of boxes, I think it’s the stuff Rapidrob has gotten.


#12

Not all of the Garands that went to Denmark were used Surplus guns (American-made). Beretta Roma made some Garands not only for the Italian forces, but also on contract for Denmark, and so marked on the rear of the receiver. I have one of those Beretta-made guns - very heavily used by a good shooter just the same.Mine is Navy marked, that marking probably done in Denmark, not in Italy like the the primary Danish markings were.


#13

Both Beretta and Breda made Garands for our armed forces. The MAP rifles were given back as per the arrangement made back in 1949-50, hence the “woodless danes” the CMP had a bunch of a while back.
My own Garand is a real mixmaster of parts from every supplier of parts there was, except LMR, since the barrel is a replacement item made by Springfield arsenal in 1953. The receiver is an IH from 1955(!)
The italian made rifles were sold to a wholesaler who took them apart and sold the parts to a number of firms making ‘new’ rifles, some of them in .308 even. Waffen Schumacher in Germany has these “danish” rifles in their shop.
waffenschumacher.com/shop_86 … Cchsen.htm
And now back to our regular programming in .30-06 :-)
Soren


#14

Great information on the Danish 6.5. I have a box of those HAs and have actually fired a few in my AG42b. Prior to these postings, I knew nothing about them other than their Danish source.