What happened here?


#1

Did someone try to nail it to the wall?
image


#2

[quote=“sksvlad”]Did someone try to nail it to the wall?
[/quote]
I think I’ve seen things like this before. In my opinion, they are firing pin marks from trying to fire a revolver with the cylinder not completely closed.


#3

I agree, it looks like hammer strikes from an out of alignment cylinder (or a single shot such as a Contender that wouldnt shut properly, but not in that calibre) . Someone had a few attempt at getting it to go and its just as well it didn’t work because if the cylinder was that far out of sync it would be dangerous.

There is another possibility, I am asolutely sure it wouldn’t apply here but it might just come up some other time. Shooters of rare calibres that have to buy expensive cases, such as Bertrams, to reload often place a light centrepunch mark on the base of the case each time it is used so they can keep a tally of how many times the case has been fired. I have only ever seen it done with cases for the martini 577/.450. The practice is almost certainly restricted to those sort of cartridges.

However, one day someone will come on here and say “I’ve just bought a Snider case with fifteen little dents in the base…” By then I will probably locked away in some Institution for the Demented so I thought I had better mention it now.


#4

One other possibility comes to mind - kids!
As a young boy I, and my friends tried setting up a live cartridge, in sand or a hole in a piece of wood, and shooting at it with airguns. We rarely hit the primer but when we did the result was quite exiting.

gravelbelly


#5

Vince

You’re not ready for a home - not yet anyway. Marking fired cases with punch marks or notches is fairly common. At least the practice was fairly common back in the days when fired cases were like gold. Now that brass is easily available it’s far easier to simply throw the cases away when they get tired. Some competition shooters still mark their brass so that the cases are fired an equal number of times.

Ray


#6

Just a thought (and probably not a very good one) but could it be someone tried to fire this centerfire cartridge in a rimfire pistol?


#7

[quote=“gravelbelly”]One other possibility comes to mind - kids!
As a young boy I, and my friends tried setting up a live cartridge, in sand or a hole in a piece of wood, and shooting at it with airguns. We rarely hit the primer but when we did the result was quite exiting.

gravelbelly[/quote]

Gravelbelly,

I think we’ve all done that at some time!


#8

Shotmeister, I think if it were an attempt to fire it in a RF pistol the marks would be nearer the edge.

A couple of other possibilities do come to mind. I can’t imagine why anyone would want to but putting it in a .45 or similar would cause hammer strikes in about that position on the case but thats too improbable for words. It might just work if you hooked the rim of the case over the side of the cylinder but more likely it would just fall through as the cylinder turned.

It did occour to me that the round is a .38S&W and a lot of pistols in that calibre arer top breaks. If the latch wasn’t closing properly that might fit the bill.

One last possibility, pistols with extremely worn or faulty mechanisms can sometimes “windmill”. This typically happens when three shots out of the six have been fired. The imbalance of weight distribution caused by having three loaded rounds on one side of the cylinder against three empty cases on the other side can be sufficient to cause the cylinder to roll back again slightly and thus prevent the locking pin from engaging properly. At that stage the hammer shouldn’t fall but who knows with an old gun? A worn star on the cylinder or a faulty/loose lifter would have the same effect


#9

Worn guns can skip as well. The reverse of windmill, where if the gun is cocked or cycled fast, the cylinder notch over-rides the cylinder bolt and keeps going a ways. I had that happen with one of my .44-40 SAA Colts. Of course, we speed cock them in CAS in a way they were never meant to be operated. Cost me a new cylinder, as welding up the notches and recutting them is kind of a half-a—d solution. These days, the gunsmithing costs almost as much as a cylinder to repair a notch anyway.

John Moss