What is this? Found in the phillipines in the jungle


#1

This was found by the Aeita tribe in the jungle of the philipines. I am told it was a piece of an antitank round. it has rifling band but NO primer i can see. Did the the projectile fit in this and this piece fit in the cartridge. It is SUPER heavy. The base feels like it is solid iron. Thoughts please?
i1277.photobucket.com/albums/y49 … 5ec241.jpg

i1277.photobucket.com/albums/y49 … ec7b60.jpg


#2

It’s the lower part of a Shrapnel projectile. Either 3" or 75mm depending on who used it.

Ray


#3

Spelling of the name of the country is PHILIPPINES…

Randy


#4

Ray,
THANKS. I appreciate your help. It is about 2 3/4" in diameter. Any idea was it Japanese or American? Would someone have had to take it apart for it to survive? The rifling band looks like it was worn so could it have been shot and hit the dirt? It is not deformed in any way. Love your thoughts please?

Thanks!!!


#5

It could have come from the early 1900s all the way up to the 1950s. Possibly from the so-called Philippine Insurection of 1899-1902 or from WW II. My guess is it’s US. 3" if it’s Navy and 75mm if it’s Army.

Unfortunately, it’s nearly impossible to positively ID it in that condition. That harsh climate is no friend of steel.

It’s been fired. A shrapnel projectile does not burst. A small charge of black powder expels the fuze and head, followed by the shrapnel which fans out like a big shot shell. All of the projectile parts fall to earth realtively undamaged. The grooves on the copper rotating band were engraved by the cannon’s rifleing.

Because the projectile of a shrapnel cartridge is not usually damaged, they are often found and easily rebuilt.

Ray


#6

I’m sure it’s a long shot, but a bit of the Splendid Little War was fought in the Philippines in the summer of 1898, so maybe the shell is Spanish. Jack


#7

I’m pretty sure it’s not from Custer’s Last Stand. ;-) ;-)

Did you know that one of Custer’s officers, who survived the Little Big Horn, was in the Philippine War as a Colonel of Volunteers, promoted to Brigidier General, and was awarded two Silver Stars for gallantry in action.

Just a tidbit of history for those of you who are, like me, history buffs.

Ray


#8

For an explanation of what Shrapnel shells are, and how they work, check out the IAA “Cartridge of the MOnth” for January 2007 at:
http://cartridgecollectors.org/cmo/cmo07jan.htm


#9

Ray: Apropos of not a whole lot, a number of years ago I stumbled upon Warren Ripley’s Artillery and Ammunition of the [American] Civil War. It took very little leafing through that work to realize that while muzzle loading artillery and its ammunition wasn’t of much interest to me, the book was too good not to take home and read pretty carefully. It’s one of the very few books on any arms-related topic I’ve ever read that I felt was truly magisterial. Jack


#10

[quote=“RayMeketa”]I’m pretty sure it’s not from Custer’s Last Stand. ;-) ;-)

Did you know that one of Custer’s officers, who survived the Little Big Horn, was in the Philippine War as a Colonel of Volunteers, promoted to Brigidier General, and was awarded two Silver Stars for gallantry in action.

Just a tidbit of history for those of you who are, like me, history buffs.

Ray[/quote]
Someone survived that one sided battle? He must have been a fast runner! All those Indans would have put up a fair chase!


#11

There were more survivors than casualties. Only the 5 companies with Custer were killed. The 7 companies with Reno and Benteen lived to see another day. Well, most of them nayway.

Ray