What is this Lefaucheux cartridge from 1832?

This is a plate from the first (1834) issue of Journal des Armes Spéciales with a long article comparing the first Lefaucheux breechloader (percussion) to the Robert rifle.

The article goes into quite a bit of detail on the pros and cons of the two cartridges too.

You can see the picture of the Robert gun and cartridges and the ~40 page article I scanned in here if you want to read it (it’s in French):

1 Like

Hi Aaron.
Two really neat early cartridges. Too bad they are not pinfires. Do you have either of them?
Cheers,
Will.

Excellent Aaron, thanks for sharing. A very similar Lefaucheux gun is also illustrated in the No. 5183 patent addition from 1833.

The No. 5979 patent addition from 1834 illustrates the following cartridge:

5979-1

Regards,

Fede

Fede,
Is there a patent associated with the ignition systems for either of these guns?
W.

Hi Will,

They are percussion guns. The capsule is nor a primer but a replaceable metal cup made of copper used to avoid gas leaks through the breech, while the cartouche is a disposable paper container loaded with powder and shot (most is burned after firing). They could be used as muzzleloaders as well, using only the copper cup as a breech obturator.

Regards,

Fede

That’s what Aaron’s looked like to me but it never hurts to ask. The Roberts is tube primed. If anyone has a spare Roberts tube, I know a good home for it.

i can find you scans of the original booklet of the manufacturing process of Roberts tube
jp

1 Like

J.P. Yes Please! I have never seen any description of the manufacturing process for tubes.

Cheers,
Will.

hi Will
here is an extract of the paper
it was written in January 1832 by Robert
very well documented
even about the room, the light, the tools and so on

  1. the room must be well lit
  2. the sun’s rays must not enter it
    because their action breaks down the powder
    and would greatly promote its explosion

and so on

i send you the document

jp

1 Like

Aaron.
Please email me. I have some info on a pinfire. Sorry, I can’t post it since it has a current copyright.

Cheers,
Will.

Came across this picture recently too:

63aa501a3b240437a670b92dff189c93878692a1

Maybe these are what the Pauly->Roux->Picherau->Lefaucheux “blind rosette” screws into to use in this gun?

The rosette could look like this, maybe.

1 Like

Also, I just finished a little more of a write up on these early French journals and this particular article in them.

1 Like

Nice Work !!!
Bsrg, Dan

1 Like

Aaron
your rosette is not a Lefaucheux, but a Pichereau

jp

I assume Lefaucheux’s addition to Picherau’s patent used the same rosettes to essentially seal the breech?

Do you think this is incorrect?

If it is not incorrect, then how do you know if Picherau or Lefaucheux made it?

Also, I am not sure anyone said it was a Lefaucheux rosette to begin with. But now you have me wondering why it may not be?

HI Aaron
The first rosette is a pauly one but not made by Pauly, but later in Danmark.
The second rosette is a Pichereau one, i confirm.
Lefauchezx did not use the same rosettes as Pauly ones.
The entrance of the chambers do not have tge conical slope of the Pauly rosettes.
I know because we have the guns.
I am on my phone right now.
I will show you pictures of gun and rosette when i will be on computer.
PS the Lefaucheux ctges you showed are modern cooies, but you know that i am sure.
JP

This was from the new Georg Priestel book.

Here is a good example of one by Lefaucheux, after he bought Picherau, but before his 1828 patent.

I would love to see pictures of others though, and especially the breech!

1 Like