What's in the flour tin (30 USA)


#1

From time to time someone will bring an old coffee can or box
down to the pistol range usually filled with old worthless ammo.
Today it was an old beat up aluminum flour canister full of 12 and 16 ga
shotguns shells and 9 rounds of centerfire ammo.

They were marked “30 USA Rem UMC”. I had no idea what 30 USA was
till I looked it up. (30/40 Krag). I added it to my small collection.

1/2 a box of Norma 7.7 Jap
3 boxes of Carcano 7.35 in the stripper clips.
and a cheese wedge of 303 Brit which I gave away.


#2

I am interested in the M37 8mm with British language sticker.
What is the story with that?
Which English speaking country used an 8mm light machine gun in the 70’s?


#3

Pitfighter - That PPU marking is from Prvi Partizan in Serbia, and the label would be a re-label of ammo exported for sale from Serbia. It’s English probably due to being imported into the U.S. by a company like Interarms or somebody. The Serbians used 7.92 for decades after WWII, and still have guns like the Zastava M76 rifle to shoot that caliber in. That particular box would have been meant for use in the Italian Breda Machine gun of that caliber variation.

There was a thread here a couple years ago about this label: https://forum.cartridgecollectors.org/t/7-92x57-ppu-for-light-machine-gun-m37/9642/1


#4

30 USA stands for 30 United States Army, which the Krag cartridge was known as for many years…

Randy


#5

The ammo box label in the other thread clearly says “Zbrojowka” on the same line as M37.
So I assume the M37 on the 7.9 mm box refers to the Czechoslovak M37 (commercially called ZB53) machine gun, that was exported in considerable numbers.


#6

8mm was used mainly by the British in the BESA MG. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Besa_machine_gun


#7

Jochem, in my opinion this PPU label doesn’t specifies use in a ZB vz.37 because it wouldn’t be what Yugoslavia termed a “light machine gun”, and on the other hand, between 1936-40 this country bought c. 30.000 units of the vz.30j light machine gun, which was adopted under designation “M37” and seems to be the most probable option.

Matt, the ammunition for Breda machine guns was repacked in Yugoslavia but its designation was “8 mm” and the gun was clearly indicated as “Breda M37”.


#8

Thanks - the pics have gone now it appears.

I had thought about the interarms type of connection -
I have a box of 7.92 Kurz which is marked in English, made in Germany 1950 - which I believe was for importation to the US.

The box in the photo appeared more military in font/format though, which is why i posed the question -
The Besa tank MG was phased out in the 1960’s so this could be an option - usually 7.92 IZ designation, I believe?