Winchester .30 Army Box


#1

Hi, All…
Illustrated is what is quite possibly the earliest commercial box by Winchester in .30 Army caliber. The call-out “40 Grs.” Smokeless Powder is believed to have been very short-lived, soon to be replaced with just “Smokeless Powder”. The reason for this seems to be that none of the early (as well as later) smokeless powder charges were actually 40 grains; they fall in the 34 to 39 grain range depending on powder type.
The cartridges in the box are headstamped W.R.A.Co. 30 U.S.G. and exhibit a 220 grain CNCS bullet with one knurled cannelure, #2-1/2 brass primer with W in circle, and a charge of 36 grains of Peyton powder.



Randy


#2

Very pleasant box, thanks. Talking about Winchester, I knew about Winchester Mansion in San Jose,CA, but I did not know why she built it that way youtube.com/watch?v=zGKq3-AZcBQ.
Here is a Wiki version of events:
When Winchester died on December 11, 1880, his ownership in the company passed to his son, William Wirt Winchester, who died of tuberculosis in March of the next year. William’s wife Sarah believed the family was cursed by the spirits killed by the Winchester rifle, and moved to San Jose, California and began building a chaotic mansion now known as the Winchester Mystery House with her inheritance, intending to confuse the spirits seeking revenge.


#3

WHAT A NICE EARLY WINCHESTER BOX - IN MY FAVORITE CALIBER - AND IN GREAT CONDITION. ARE YOU SURE ABOUT THE POWDER BEING PEYTON - I THOUGHT PERHAPS IT WOULD HAVE BEEN BALLISTITE.

SARAH WINCHESTER WAS A VERY INTELLIGENT INDIVIDUAL - SHE SPOKE 4 OR 5 LANGUAGES FLUENTLY BY THE AGE OF 12 ALSO HAD MASTERED THE PIANO BY THAT TIME.


#4

GWB…

Yes, the cartridges in this box are loaded with Peyton…the green variety…

Here is another early Winchester box, military contract, pull string to open, circa 1894, the cartridges in this one are loaded with 38.8 grains of Ballistite…
Notice the nomenclature describing the bullet "220 Grain Ball"


These exhibit an early style bullet similar to Frankford Arsenal bullets of this time period with the exception of one shallow cannelure and no knurling, with raised W in the lead at the base, #2-1/2 primer with W and no circle.

Randy


#5

Unfortunately, in her later years, Mrs. Winchester became somewhat eccentric. I think there was something about living so long as she continued to add on to the Mansion. It is a bizarre place, but a must see if you are ever in that part of the country. If not a museum open to the public, it probably could not be left “as is” under modern building regulations. It could be a quite dangerous place, with upstairs doors opening to find nothing behind them but a injurious fall to the ground ourside if you stepped over the threshold in the dark, and thinks like that. It is, though, a guided tour well worth the admission. They have a nice little gun display of Winchesters there - certainly no Cody Museum, but fun to see. I hope it is still there. In California, it is hard to say. San Francisco’s De Young Museum had a nice gun room, complete with a little French WWI Tank, and they decided “they needed the room” so the collection went to Los Angeles for a display, and ended up being broken up and sold there. SF residents didn’t even get a chance to buy any part of it.


#6

To add to Johns comments Mrs. Winchester never allowed visitors to enter through the front door. Teddy Roosevelt stopped by to visit and was told to use the rear door. He was offended and left. She was also camera shy and very few pictures of her exist.
Gourd


#7

She also paid the workers in cash every day, and if they tried to correct what she wanted, no matte how bizarre. She would fire them on the spot! My 2 cents very well worth the time go take the tour. but what was neat, they had a penny press that you could press the Winchester trade mark on a squashed penny.


#8

Is it not possible there is an earlier box that omits reference to the 95 Winchester? I ask because the 1894/95 Montgomery Ward catalog lists this cartridge, along with the Winchester single shot rifle to use it, but lists no Winchester rifles later than the 1892. Jack